Jewish American Heritage Month

Posted By admin on September 22, 2014

X-CHILDREN project Gaza If you see the joy of life in the eyes of your children; play and laugh with them every day, and hold them as close as possible to your heart, you can consider yourself a lucky human being.

Original post: X-CHILDREN project Gaza Video

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Posted By admin on September 21, 2014

GAZA CITY In the weeks of relative calm since an open-ended truce went into effect after “Operation Protective Edge,” children have been allowed to venture out again. Days before school started youd see them scrambling over rubble, often the ruins of their own homes, playing with siblings and friends

View original post here: Back to school in Gaza

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Posted By admin on September 21, 2014

Gaza News Soldier sent home from Afghanistan Soldier sent home from Afghanistan after filming foul mouthed protest rap and posting it online. By: News Gaza

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Jewish American Heritage Month

Jewish American Heritage Month 2014

May is Jewish American Heritage Month

The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Jewish Americans who have helped form the fabric of American history, culture and society. Read more

U.S. Army team searching for weapons of mass destruction discovered over 2,700 Jewish books and tens of thousands of documents. To provide accessibility throughout the world to the damaged materials, the US National Archives and Records Administration and its partners have preserved, cataloged, and digitized the books and documents. More about the preservation efforts

During World War II, American art historians, museum and art professionals, and archivists were deployed as military officers to protect historical monuments, art, and archives in war theaters throughout western Europe. These monuments men were part of the militarys Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives (MFAA) program. The National Gallery of Art played a seminal role in its creation. More about the Monuments Men

The National Gallery of Art recently unveiled a permanent and public home for the exquisite glass and stone mosaic Orphe, designed by Marc Chagall and bequeathed to the Gallery by arts patron Evelyn Stefansson Nef.

More about the Chagall mosaic

Fighting Nazi Germany took on special significance for one group of U.S. servicemen in the European Theater. Even those Jewish soldiers and sailors who were serving elsewhere in World War II understood that defeating the Axis would be a defeat for blind hatred of any ethnic group or nationality.

Visit the Online Exhibition

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Jewish American Heritage Month 2014

May is Jewish American Heritage Month

Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz

Arlen Specter

On April 20, 2006, President George W. Bush proclaimed that May would be Jewish American Heritage Month. The announcement was the crowning achievement in an effort by the Jewish Museum of Florida and South Florida Jewish community leaders that resulted in resolutions introduced by Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida and Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania urging the president to proclaim a month that would recognize the more than 350-year history of Jewish contributions to American culture. The resolutions passed unanimously, first in the House of Representatives in December 2005 and later in the Senate in February 2006. Most recently, President Barack Obama issued a proclamation on May 1, 2012 in which he stated that “generations of Jewish Americans have brought to bear some of our country’s greatest achievements and forever enriched our national life.”

Since 2006, JAHM programs have taken place across the country. In Washington, D.C. alone, the Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution, and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum have joined in raising national consciousness about the contributions of Jewish Americans to our countrys heritage.

The JAHM Coalition was formed in March 2007 and convened by United Jewish Communities (now The Jewish Federations of North America), The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives (AJA) and the American Jewish Historical Society (AJHS). The JAHM Coalition was composed of the directors of major national Jewish historical and cultural organizations including the AJA, AJHS, Jewish Women’s Archive, the National Museum of American Jewish History, the Council of American Jewish Museums, Jewish Museum of Florida, and the Jewish Historical Society of Washington, D.C. In 2009, the Coalition named a national coordinator. Also in 2009 the Coalition welcomed The Manischewitz Company as founding corporate sponsor, and partnered with SuperValu Foods to promote the May 2010 celebration. In the fall of 2010 JAHM incorporated as a tax exempt public charity with a Board of Directors and oversight by the JAHM Advisory Committee.

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May is Jewish American Heritage Month

Jewish American Heritage Month – Wikipedia, the free …

Jewish American Heritage Month

President Obama welcomes guests to 2010 JAHM White House reception.

Jewish American Heritage Month (JAHM) is an annual recognition and celebration of Jewish American achievements in and contributions to the United States of America. It is observed annually in the U.S. during the month of May.[1]

JAHM was set into law by President George W. Bush in 2006, according to the Jewish American Heritage Month Coalition. This is the achievement of Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) and Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA), as well as the Jewish Museum of Florida and the South Florida Jewish Community.[2] A similar month exists in Florida as Florida Jewish History Month but it occurs in January.[3]

President George W. Bush announced that May would be Jewish American Heritage Month in April 2006. The announcement was an achievement in the effort of the Jewish Museum of Florida and South Florida Jewish Community leaders for a celebration of Jewish Americans and Jewish American Heritage.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) and Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA) urged the president to proclaim a month that would recognize the more than 350-year history of Jewish contributions to America and the American culture. The resolutions were passed unanimously, first in the United States House of Representatives in December 2005 and later in the United States Senate in February 2006.[4]

The Jewish American Heritage Month Coalition states that, “JAHM also enables the exploration of the meaning of religious pluralism, cultural diversity, and participation in American civic culture.”[5]

According to Library of Congress hosted website, JewishHeritageMonth.gov, May was chosen as the month of Jewish American Heritage Month because of the successful 350th Anniversary Celebration of Jews in America.[6]

Celebration of Jewish American Heritage Month is encouraged on a national level. In some schools, assemblies have been held in celebration.

JAHM has been recognized in Madison Square Garden in New York City. It has also been recognized in some Jewish museums. Additionally, some institutions, including the Library of Congress, have included shorter periods within the month for special lectures, programs, or displays, such as the Library of Congress “Jewish Heritage Week” lecture series.

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Jewish American Heritage Month – Wikipedia, the free …

Fall TV Season Ushers In More Nuanced Portrayals of Race

A ritual dance performed during fall TV seasons of yore involved parsing the new dramas and comedies for any examples of diversity in casting or, more often, noting the profound lack of it then expressing predictable outrage at the networks shortcomings in that area.

Press releases would go out from watchdog groups representing minorities asking why census numbers never seemed to translate to pilot season; the networks would officially share that concern, offering whatever response they had come up with this time around – including token casting of minorities in auxiliary best friend, junior partner and precinct captain roles, sometimes even offering a minority president of the United States as a fantasy before that became a reality.

Over the past couple of years, the industry got distracted by the much bigger and more dire story of televisions future as a business model how would it be watched, by whom, on what devices, with ratings success or failure measured by what sort of new metrics?

In this chaos, while no one was rattling the networks cages, a beautiful thing happened: For the first time in recent memory, theres a noticeable breakthrough in the characters and cultures that make up this falls schedule. While they are not nearly as diverse as the households that might tune in, some of the new shows have a remarkably casual and more entertaining approach to the self-conscious burden that comes with telling minority stories. From a critical standpoint, these shows are doing a better job by choosing what one might call a post-racial approach.

ABCs new comedy Black-ish, premiering Wednesday night after the sixth-season return of Modern Family, will get the most scrutiny from viewers who are curious about its comedic take on the lives of a well-off African-American family. Premise-wise, Black-ish is somewhat thin: Co-creator/producer Anthony Anderson stars as Andre, a successful advertising executive married to a pediatric surgeon (Tracee Ellis Ross); Andre worries that his children are growing up in a bubble of whiteness and forgetting their culture and heritage.

As he tries to steer his brood toward heritage awareness (throwing his 13-year-old son a bro mitzvah instead of the bar mitzvah the lad longs for), Andre is mocked by his wife and his father (Laurence Fishburne) for leaning toward stereotype rather than recognizing how the world has moved on. Black-ish succeeds as a simple comedy in which the writers, performers and the viewer are asked to notice race by not noticing it. (Instead, class and wealth seem to be the bigger issues.)

The show has so much less to do with race than it does culture and identity and family, co-creator and writer Kenya Barris told reporters in July during the summer TV press tour. (Race) is honestly something were not running from, obviously, by our title, which we stick behind really fervently.

But Black-ish, Barris said, is about life inside a quote-unquote post-Obama society where race (and) culture are talked about less than ever before. … My kids are living in such a homogenized world where there really isnt a white or black kid within them. … Weve all taken a little bit of -ish from each of us, and we blend it into who we are today as a people.

-Ish is an increasingly useful concept in scripted television, which, as a venue for make-believe, will never do a perfect job of reflecting society as it is. A little-ish goes a long way in a TV show about anyone, minority or otherwise. Example: The Goldbergs, a ratings success for ABC, is clearly about a Jewish family, whove apparently never once made reference to being Jewish. This has the broadening effect of making them Jewish-ish. Likewise, Modern Family found huge success by -ishing its gay characters just enough that they became welcome guests in the homes of viewers who previously seemed allergic to stories of gay male couples.

By letting -ish work its slight magic, ABC more effortlessly scheduled back-to-back dramas on Thursday from hitmaker Shonda Rhimes that each star a strong black female character starting with Scandal, which will now accompany How to Get Away With Murder. The new drama stars Oscar-nominated actress Viola Davis, who told reporters and critics that she took the TV job because much of the film work she was being offered felt marginalized. It was as if, she said, I (had) been invited to a really fabulous party, only to hold up the wall.

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Fall TV Season Ushers In More Nuanced Portrayals of Race

Fall TV Season Ushers In More Nuanced Portrayals of Race

A ritual dance performed during fall TV seasons of yore involved parsing the new dramas and comedies for any examples of diversity in casting or, more often, noting the profound lack of it then expressing predictable outrage at the networks shortcomings in that area.

Press releases would go out from watchdog groups representing minorities asking why census numbers never seemed to translate to pilot season; the networks would officially share that concern, offering whatever response they had come up with this time around – including token casting of minorities in auxiliary best friend, junior partner and precinct captain roles, sometimes even offering a minority president of the United States as a fantasy before that became a reality.

Over the past couple of years, the industry got distracted by the much bigger and more dire story of televisions future as a business model how would it be watched, by whom, on what devices, with ratings success or failure measured by what sort of new metrics?

In this chaos, while no one was rattling the networks cages, a beautiful thing happened: For the first time in recent memory, theres a noticeable breakthrough in the characters and cultures that make up this falls schedule. While they are not nearly as diverse as the households that might tune in, some of the new shows have a remarkably casual and more entertaining approach to the self-conscious burden that comes with telling minority stories. From a critical standpoint, these shows are doing a better job by choosing what one might call a post-racial approach.

ABCs new comedy Black-ish, premiering Wednesday night after the sixth-season return of Modern Family, will get the most scrutiny from viewers who are curious about its comedic take on the lives of a well-off African-American family. Premise-wise, Black-ish is somewhat thin: Co-creator/producer Anthony Anderson stars as Andre, a successful advertising executive married to a pediatric surgeon (Tracee Ellis Ross); Andre worries that his children are growing up in a bubble of whiteness and forgetting their culture and heritage.

As he tries to steer his brood toward heritage awareness (throwing his 13-year-old son a bro mitzvah instead of the bar mitzvah the lad longs for), Andre is mocked by his wife and his father (Laurence Fishburne) for leaning toward stereotype rather than recognizing how the world has moved on. Black-ish succeeds as a simple comedy in which the writers, performers and the viewer are asked to notice race by not noticing it. (Instead, class and wealth seem to be the bigger issues.)

The show has so much less to do with race than it does culture and identity and family, co-creator and writer Kenya Barris told reporters in July during the summer TV press tour. (Race) is honestly something were not running from, obviously, by our title, which we stick behind really fervently.

But Black-ish, Barris said, is about life inside a quote-unquote post-Obama society where race (and) culture are talked about less than ever before. … My kids are living in such a homogenized world where there really isnt a white or black kid within them. … Weve all taken a little bit of -ish from each of us, and we blend it into who we are today as a people.

-Ish is an increasingly useful concept in scripted television, which, as a venue for make-believe, will never do a perfect job of reflecting society as it is. A little-ish goes a long way in a TV show about anyone, minority or otherwise. Example: The Goldbergs, a ratings success for ABC, is clearly about a Jewish family, whove apparently never once made reference to being Jewish. This has the broadening effect of making them Jewish-ish. Likewise, Modern Family found huge success by -ishing its gay characters just enough that they became welcome guests in the homes of viewers who previously seemed allergic to stories of gay male couples.

By letting -ish work its slight magic, ABC more effortlessly scheduled back-to-back dramas on Thursday from hitmaker Shonda Rhimes that each star a strong black female character starting with Scandal, which will now accompany How to Get Away With Murder. The new drama stars Oscar-nominated actress Viola Davis, who told reporters and critics that she took the TV job because much of the film work she was being offered felt marginalized. It was as if, she said, I (had) been invited to a really fabulous party, only to hold up the wall.

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Fall TV Season Ushers In More Nuanced Portrayals of Race

Top regional attractions

African American Museum 701 Arch St.; 215-574-0380. www.aampmuseum.org. $10; $8 seniors, students and children. Tue.-Sat. 10 am-5 pm, Sun. noon-5 pm.

American Philosophical Society Museum 104 S. 5th St.; 215-440-3400. www.apsmuseum.org. Donation requested: $2. Apr.-Oct: Thu.-Sun. 10 am-4 pm; Nov.-Dec.: Fri.-Sun. 10 am-4 pm.

American Swedish Historical Museum 1900 Pattison Ave.; 215-389-1776. www.americanswedish.org. Featuring exhibits dedicated to Swedish American history, Swedish arts & culture. $8; $6 seniors & students; $5 children 5-11; free for children under 5. Tue.-Fri. 10 am-4 pm, Sat.-Sun. noon-4 pm.

Bartram’s Garden 54th St.; 215-729-5281. www.bartramsgarden.org. America’s oldest living botanical garden & the pre-revolutionary home of naturalist, botanist & explorer John Bartram. Grounds: Daily 10 am-5 pm. Tours: Mar.-2nd week of Dec.: noon-4 pm.

Betsy Ross House 239 Arch St.; 215-686-1252. www.betsyrosshouse.org. $4; $3 seniors, military & children under 13. Jan.-Feb.: Wed.-Sun. 10 am-5 pm; Mar.-Sep.: Daily 10 am-5 pm; Oct.-Dec.: Tue-Sun. 10 am-5 pm.

Christ Church Second St.; 215-922-1695. www.christchurchphila.org. Visit the “Nation’s Church” to sit where Washington and Franklin did. Donation suggested: $3; $2 students. Mon.-Sat. 9 am-5 pm; Sun. 1-5 pm; Closed Mon.-Tue. in Jan. & Feb..

Christ Church Burial Ground 5th & Arch Sts.; 215-922-1695. www.christchurchphila.org. Final resting place of Benjamin Franklin & 4 other signers of the Declaration of Independence. $2; $1 students; Guided tours additional fee. Mon-Sat. 10 am-4 pm; Sun. noon-4 pm, weather permitting, Mar.-Nov. Limited hrs. in Dec. Closed Jan. & Feb..

Eastern State Penitentiary 22nd St. & Fairmount Ave.; 215-236-3300. www.easternstate.org. The vaulted, sky-lit cells of this prison once held many of America’s most notorious criminals, including bank robber Willie Sutton & Al Capone. $14; $12 seniors; $10 students and children 7 and over. Daily 10 am-5 pm.

Elfreth’s Alley Second St.; 215-574-0560. www.elfrethsalley.org. $2; $1 children 6-18. Mon.-Sat. 10 am-5 pm, Sun. noon-5 pm.

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Top regional attractions

May is Jewish American Heritage Month

By Congressional resolution and Presidential proclamation, MAY is Jewish American Heritage Month (JAHM).

A national month of recognition of the more than 350-year history of Jewish contributions to American culture, JAHM acknowledges the achievements of American Jews in fields ranging from sports and arts and entertainment to medicine, business, science, government, and military service.

The JAHM website is an interactive clearinghouse for events, programs, and activities nationwide and a resource for school and community leaders. Submit your events, sign up for email updates, and find out whats happening in your neighborhood and across the country.

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May is Jewish American Heritage Month

Fall TV season 2014: In portraying race, a little -ish can help a lot

A ritual dance performed during fall TV seasons of yore involved parsing the new dramas and comedies for any examples of diversity in casting or, more often, noting the profound lack of it and then expressing predictable outrage at the networks shortcomings in that area.

Press releases would go out from watchdog groups representing minorities asking why census numbers never seemed to translate to pilot season; the networks would officially share that concern, offering whatever response they had come up with this time around including token casting of minorities in auxiliary best friend, junior partner and precinct captain roles, sometimes even offering a minority president of the United States as a fantasy before that became a reality.

Over the past couple of years, the industry got distracted by the much bigger and more dire story of televisions future as a business model how would it be watched, by whom, on what devices, with ratings success or failure measured by what sort of new metrics?

In this chaos, while no one was rattling the networks cages, a beautiful thing happened: For the first time in recent memory, theres a noticeable breakthrough in the characters and cultures that make up this falls schedule. While they are not nearly as diverse as the households that might tune in, some of the new shows have a remarkably casual and more entertaining approach to the self-conscious burden that comes with telling minority stories. From a critical standpoint, these shows are doing a better job by choosing what one might call a post-racial approach.

ABCs new comedy Black-ish, premiering Wednesday night after the sixth-season return of Modern Family, will get the most scrutiny from viewers who are curious about its comedic take on the lives of a well-off African American family. Premise-wise, Black-ish is somewhat thin: Co-creator/producer Anthony Anderson stars as Andre, a successful advertising executive married to a pediatric surgeon (Tracee Ellis Ross); Andre worries that his children are growing up in a bubble of whiteness and forgetting their culture and heritage.

As he tries to steer his brood toward heritage awareness (throwing his 13-year-old son a bro mitzvah instead of the bar mitzvah the lad longs for), Andre is mocked by his wife and his father (Laurence Fishburne) for leaning toward stereotype rather than recognizing how the world has moved on. Black-ish succeeds as a simple comedy in which the writers, performers and the viewer are asked to notice race by not noticing it. (Instead, class and wealth seem to be the bigger issues.)

The show has so much less to do with race than it does culture and identity and family, co-creator and writer Kenya Barris told reporters in July during the summer TV press tour. [Race] is honestly something were not running from, obviously, by our title, which we stick behind really fervently.

But Black-ish, Barris said, is about life inside a quote-unquote post-Obama society where race [and] culture are talked about less than ever before. … My kids are living in such a homogenized world where there really isnt a white or black kid within them. … Weve all taken a little bit of -ish from each of us, and we blend it into who we are today as a people.

-Ish is an increasingly useful concept in scripted television, which, as a venue for make-believe, will never do a perfect job of reflecting society as it is. A little-ish goes a long way in a TV show about anyone, minority or otherwise. Example: The Goldbergs, a ratings success for ABC, is clearly about a Jewish family, whove apparently never once made reference to being Jewish. This has the broadening effect of making them Jewish-ish. Likewise, Modern Family found huge success by -ishing its gay characters just enough that they became welcome guests in the homes of viewers who previously seemed allergic to stories of gay male couples.

By letting -ish work its slight magic, ABC more effortlessly scheduled back-to-back dramas on Thursday from hitmaker Shonda Rhimes that each star a strong black female character starting with Scandal, which will now accompany How to Get Away With Murder. The new drama stars Oscar-nominated actress Viola Davis, who told reporters and critics that she took the TV job because much of the film work she was being offered felt marginalized. It was as if, she said, I [had] been invited to a really fabulous party, only to hold up the wall.

Read more:
Fall TV season 2014: In portraying race, a little -ish can help a lot

Fall TV season 2014: In portraying race, a little -ish can help a lot

A ritual dance performed during fall TV seasons of yore involved parsing the new dramas and comedies for any examples of diversity in casting or, more often, noting the profound lack of it and then expressing predictable outrage at the networks shortcomings in that area.

Press releases would go out from watchdog groups representing minorities asking why census numbers never seemed to translate to pilot season; the networks would officially share that concern, offering whatever response they had come up with this time around including token casting of minorities in auxiliary best friend, junior partner and precinct captain roles, sometimes even offering a minority president of the United States as a fantasy before that became a reality.

Over the past couple of years, the industry got distracted by the much bigger and more dire story of televisions future as a business model how would it be watched, by whom, on what devices, with ratings success or failure measured by what sort of new metrics?

In this chaos, while no one was rattling the networks cages, a beautiful thing happened: For the first time in recent memory, theres a noticeable breakthrough in the characters and cultures that make up this falls schedule. While they are not nearly as diverse as the households that might tune in, some of the new shows have a remarkably casual and more entertaining approach to the self-conscious burden that comes with telling minority stories. From a critical standpoint, these shows are doing a better job by choosing what one might call a post-racial approach.

ABCs new comedy Black-ish, premiering Wednesday night after the sixth-season return of Modern Family, will get the most scrutiny from viewers who are curious about its comedic take on the lives of a well-off African American family. Premise-wise, Black-ish is somewhat thin: Co-creator/producer Anthony Anderson stars as Andre, a successful advertising executive married to a pediatric surgeon (Tracee Ellis Ross); Andre worries that his children are growing up in a bubble of whiteness and forgetting their culture and heritage.

As he tries to steer his brood toward heritage awareness (throwing his 13-year-old son a bro mitzvah instead of the bar mitzvah the lad longs for), Andre is mocked by his wife and his father (Laurence Fishburne) for leaning toward stereotype rather than recognizing how the world has moved on. Black-ish succeeds as a simple comedy in which the writers, performers and the viewer are asked to notice race by not noticing it. (Instead, class and wealth seem to be the bigger issues.)

The show has so much less to do with race than it does culture and identity and family, co-creator and writer Kenya Barris told reporters in July during the summer TV press tour. [Race] is honestly something were not running from, obviously, by our title, which we stick behind really fervently.

But Black-ish, Barris said, is about life inside a quote-unquote post-Obama society where race [and] culture are talked about less than ever before. … My kids are living in such a homogenized world where there really isnt a white or black kid within them. … Weve all taken a little bit of -ish from each of us, and we blend it into who we are today as a people.

-Ish is an increasingly useful concept in scripted television, which, as a venue for make-believe, will never do a perfect job of reflecting society as it is. A little-ish goes a long way in a TV show about anyone, minority or otherwise. Example: The Goldbergs, a ratings success for ABC, is clearly about a Jewish family, whove apparently never once made reference to being Jewish. This has the broadening effect of making them Jewish-ish. Likewise, Modern Family found huge success by -ishing its gay characters just enough that they became welcome guests in the homes of viewers who previously seemed allergic to stories of gay male couples.

By letting -ish work its slight magic, ABC more effortlessly scheduled back-to-back dramas on Thursday from hitmaker Shonda Rhimes that each star a strong black female character starting with Scandal, which will now accompany How to Get Away With Murder. The new drama stars Oscar-nominated actress Viola Davis, who told reporters and critics that she took the TV job because much of the film work she was being offered felt marginalized. It was as if, she said, I [had] been invited to a really fabulous party, only to hold up the wall.

Continued here:
Fall TV season 2014: In portraying race, a little -ish can help a lot

Bulletin Board

– FirstEnergy Corp. offers STEM education grants

New Jersey educators can apply for FirstEnergy Corp.s education grants for the 2014-15 school year by Sept. 19.

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) classroom grants of up to $500 will be awarded for creative, individual classroom projects for prekindergarten through grade 12.

For more information on grant criteria, visit www.firstenergycorp.com/stem.

Grant winners will be notified by Oct. 13.

– Basilone Club sets Day at the Races

The Sgt. John Basilone Italian-American Club of South River will sponsor its annual Day at the Races Sept. 20 at Monmouth Park, Oceanport.

Admission includes entrance fee, program and a hot buffet lunch.

For more information, price or to reserve, call Joe at 732-470-5185.

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Bulletin Board

Jewish American Heritage Month | EDSITEment

Each May, EDSITEment celebrates Jewish American Heritage Month by pointing to the rich array of educational resources on this subject. Many of the programs listed below are films which appeared on PBS as stand-alone specials or as part of long-running series such as American Experience and American Masters. Many of them have been funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities over the past decades. Each of them is accompanied by a multimedia website or Web page, which extends the life of the program with video clips, images, and interactives that can be used by teachers in their classroom or students doing research.

The idea of America as both a haven and a home for the religious faiths of the myriad diverse groups who, over the centuries, have immigrated to the United States is one that deeply resonates with most Americans. The blessings of religious and political liberty that these immigrants found in America were captured eloquently in George Washingtons letter to the Hebrew Congregation at Newport, Rhode Island in 1790. In this letter, Washington quotes a sentence from the Book of Micah of the Hebrew Bible:

May the children of the stock of Abraham who dwell in this land continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other inhabitantswhile every one shall sit in safety under his own vine and fig tree and there shall be none to make him afraid.

A few sentences earlier Washington addresses American Jews as equal fellow citizens (the first time in history that any national leader had done so):

It is now no more that toleration is spoken of as if it were the indulgence of one class of people that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights, for, happily, the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.

Washington’s letter was in response to one written by Moses Seixas, Warden of the Jeshuat Israel Synagogue in Rhode Island. The EDSITEment-reviewed Bill of Rights Institute has a lesson in which students can read and compare the two letters via an interactive. A related lesson plan on Washington and Religious Liberty is available on the NEH-funded website Rediscovering George Washington. The principles of civil and religious liberty extolled in this letter and embodied in our Constitution encouraged and rewarded active participation in the social, political, and cultural life of the nation with results that can be celebrated in this feature.

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A good place to begin if one wants to understand Jewish life in America would be The Jewish Americans, recently broadcast on PBS stations and partially funded by NEH. This series offers a treasure trove of video clips, images, and student interactives on such topics as the Diaspora, which sent millions of Jews to the United States, the challenges of assimilation, the rise of immigrants from street peddlers on the lower East Side of New York city to sophisticated and wealthy merchants in the fashion industry, and the critical role that philanthropic organizations and education plays in the Jewish American community. The witty essayist Joseph Epstein wrote about this program in his article Hebrew National for Humanities magazine.

A related NEH-funded website Jews in America: Our Story documents the growth of the Jewish community from a group of 23 refugees fleeing from the Portuguese Inquisition in 1654. This comprehensive website on the history and culture includes an interactive historical timeline, with a gallery of over five hundred artifacts drawn from the library, archival, and museum collections of the Center for Jewish History and its partners. Another article from Humanities, Jewish Pioneers tells the stories of the new lives that European Jews made for themselves west of the Mississippi in the 19th century. According to one scholar there wasnt a single settlement west of the Mississippi of any significance which had not had a Jewish mayor in 1900.

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Jewish American Heritage Month | EDSITEment

Around Your Town for September 18, 2014

September18 When you are shopping at the Farmers Market on Thursday, Sept. 18, stop by the Kiwanis tent and check out the many varied activities the three Sierra Vista Clubs are doing for the community and the children of Sierra Vista. The Golden K, San Pedro, and Sierra Vista clubs also encourage people to bring a nonperishable food item for the local food bank. Each donation provides the …

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Around Your Town for September 18, 2014

Around Your Town for Wednesday, September 17, 2014

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Fluorescent minerals and ultraviolet lamps will be the focus of a presentation by Bill Gardner, a vendor of UV lights, to the meeting of the Huachuca Mineral & Gem Club Wednesday, Sept. 17. The meeting will be at the Cochise College Library Conference Room at 7 p.m. The public is invited to attend. For more information, pleasecall459-3718.

The Sierra Vista Camera Club will meet Wednesday, Sept. 17 from 5 p.m. to 6:25 p.m. in the Mona Bishop Room at the Sierra Vista Public Library. Charles W. Melton will present A Nature Photographer in the Huachuca Mountains focusing on nesting aspects of five bird species. Check out the Clubs web site at http://svcameraclub.com/ for more information about the program, and general-info about the camera club. Presentation is open tothepublic.

When you are shopping at the Farmers Market on Thursday, Sept. 18, stop by the Kiwanis tent and check out the many varied activities the three Sierra Vista Clubs are doing for the community and the children of Sierra Vista. The Golden K, San Pedro, and Sierra Vista clubs also encourage people to bring a nonperishable food item for the local food bank. Each donation provides the donor a raffle ticket and there will be three raffle baskets. Stop by and check it out between 10 a.m. and2p.m.

The University of Arizona Cochise County Cooperative Extension will be presenting a sports nutrition for schools workshop at the University of Arizona Sierra Vista Campus. This free nutrition class is designed for school coaches, physical education teachers, and athletic directors, and will include: basic nutrition, athletic recommendations, common athlete concerns and more. The presentation will be held on Thursday, Sept. 18 at 2:30 p.m., at the University of Arizona Sierra Vista Campus, 1140 N Colombo Ave, Room 503. For more information, please call Brenda Holzer at (520) 458-8278extension2170.

Do you have a picky eater in your household? Are you still trying to decide what the kids will be for Halloween? This month at the Cochise Health and Social Services Parents Group, Heather Vaughn, health educator at the U of A Cooperative Extension will be discussing strategies for parents who have picky eaters in their household. Ideas will be shared for homemade Halloween costumes, including a costume fashion show. There will be games, door prizes, and snacks. Moms, dads, prenatal women, and children are welcome to join the fun on Thursday, Sept. 18, at 10 a.m., in the large conference room at the Constables office next to the health department, 4115 E Foothills Drive, inSierraVista.

The Happy Achers Senior Group of the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church, located on the corner of Buffalo Soldier Trail and St. Andrews Drive, will have its potluck in the Fellowship Hall on Thursday, Sept. 18. Joan Powell is the featured performer. Joan sings 40s and 50s swing and pop songs and also plays the guitar. Bring a covered dish and join the event at 11:10 a.m. and bring a guest if you can. For more informationcall378-1924.

Mum is the definitely the word at this months meeting of the Sierra Vista Area Gardeners Club. The public is invited to come hear a presentation by one of the club members who grows these wonderful plants. The meeting will take place on Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014 at 1 p.m., in the Constables office in the old County Complex at 4100 East Foothills Drive in Sierra Vista.For additional details, visit our site at www.svgardenclub.org or call Janeat732-1822.

1200 Club of Greater Sierra Vista will meet on Friday, Sept. 19, at Pueblo del Sol Country Club. Social time begins at 6 p.m. with dinner at 6:30 p.m. The speakers for the evening will be Republican and Independent candidates for Cochise County Superior Court, Justice of the Peace, and Clerk of the Superior Court. Cost of the meal is $22 per person. Reservations should be made by emailing Kathy Dolge at Kathy@DolgeFamily.net. Make reservations by Tuesday, Sept. 16. The 1200 Club, a Republican organization, always welcomes visitors andprospectivemembers.

The Thunder Mountain Road Crew are calling a Mainstream Square Dance for the Thunder Mountain Twirlers on Friday, Sept. 19 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Theyll call a plus tip after the dance, and Lisa Wall will cue rounds between tips. Review runs from 6:45 to 7:30 p.m. Only $4 for members, $5 for non-members, and free for non-dancers to come watch and socialize! Snacks and friendship are provided. Sierra Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall, 101 North Lenzner Avenue, in Sierra Vista. For more info contact Sandy at (520) 378-6719 oremailsvtmt@cox.net.

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Around Your Town for Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Kansas City Connection: Lots to do in KC this fall

If you ask me, fall is the best time of year to explore Kansas City. In addition to the bright colors and pleasantly cool temperatures, an abundance of festivals, concerts and activities make an autumn visit to KC a must. Here are a few seasonal highlights and ideas for what to check out.

WaterFire Kansas City (Oct. 10-11) on Brush Creek

Haunted houses in the West Bottoms

Drink coffee and take a walk

Kansas City is currently experiencing what economists call a bean boom, i.e. a proliferation of high-quality, locally owned coffee shops. Many of them are located near some of the citys finest parks and trails, setting up a perfect opportunity to grab a cafe au lait to go and take a stroll.

The excellent new Crows Coffee, 304 E. 51st St., is right next to the Trolley Track Trail and not far from Loose Park.

Mud Pie, 1615 W. 39th St., is just down the road from the hilly, wooded contours of Roanoke Park.

And Quay Coffee, 412 Delaware St. in the City Market, nearly crosses paths with the Riverfront Heritage Trail.

Go record shopping

For a few years, it looked like record buying in Kansas City might be a thing of the past, but several stores have opened recently that offer a mix of new, reissued and used vinyl.

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Kansas City Connection: Lots to do in KC this fall

How Jewish Reporters in Muslim Countries Conceal Their Identity

Steven Sotloff’s Death Raises Questions of Safety

Getty Images

Steven Sotloff (center with black helmet) talks to Libyan rebels on the Al Dafniya front line in 2011 in Misrata, Libya.

Published September 05, 2014.

(JTA) Dont bring it up. If it comes up, change the subject. If you cant change the subject, consider an outright denial. Those are some of the strategies used by Jewish reporters working in the Arab and Muslim Middle East to conceal their religious heritage.

The dangers facing Jewish journalists in the region became evident this week after the beheading of a dual American-Israeli citizen, Steven Sotloff, by the jihadist group Islamic State, or ISIS.

Its not known whether ISIS was aware that Sotloff was Jewish. Colleagues believe his kidnapping by ISIS-affiliated terrorists in 2013 in Syria was one of opportunity and not a deliberate targeting. James Foley, another journalist kidnapped by ISIS and beheaded last month by the terror group, was Catholic.

However, Sotloffs family in South Florida, his friends and colleagues indeed much of the journalistic community went to lengths to conceal his familys deep involvement in the Jewish community and his Israeli citizenship in order not to draw his captors attention to a factor that may have exacerbated his ordeal. JTA did not report on his captivity for the same reason.

The captors of Daniel Pearl, a Wall Street Journal correspondent kidnapped and beheaded by terrorists in Pakistan in 2002, made a point of his Jewishness. In the video showing his execution, they included Pearl saying My father is Jewish, my mother is Jewish. I am a Jew among his final words.

We send our deepest condolences to the family of Steven Sotloff, Pearls parents, Judea and Ruth, said in a statement emailed to JTA. We know too well the pain of such horrific loss. Once again the world has seen the horror of terrorism in action. We continue to find strength in the belief that united, civilization will triumph and humanity will prevail.

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How Jewish Reporters in Muslim Countries Conceal Their Identity

Comedian and entertainer Joan Rivers dies at age 81

Reuters: Joan Rivers, the pioneering comedian known for her acerbic wit, classic put-downs and for asking “Can we talk?,” died on Thursday at the age of 81 in a New York hospital a week after her heart stopped during an outpatient medical procedure.

Melissa Rivers, the comedian’s only child, said her mother died peacefully, surrounded by family and friends, at 1:17 p.m. EDT (1717 GMT).

“My mother’s greatest joy in life was to make people laugh. Although that is difficult to do right now, I know her final wish would be that we return to laughing soon,” Melissa Rivers added in a statement.

There were no immediate details about a funeral or memorial service.

Rivers was the second leading American comedian to die in less than a month. Groundbreaking comedy star and actor Robin Williams, 63, hanged himself on Aug. 13 in California.

As news of her death spread, photographers, reporters and television crews gathered outside the hospital where Rivers died, and fans placed bouquets of flowers at the entrance to her apartment on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

The Brooklyn-born comedian, who once described herself as “the plastic surgery poster girl” and often joked about her numerous cosmetic enhancements, suffered cardiac arrest during a procedure on her vocal cords at a Manhattan clinic on Aug. 28. She was rushed to Mount Sinai Hospital, where she was put on life support.

A spokeswoman for the Medical Examiner’s Office in New York said it is investigating the cause and manner of Rivers’s death on Thursday. She did not specify when the autopsy on Rivers would take place and when results would be released.

Friends and fellow comedians on Thursday expressed their grief and sadness and praised Rivers.

“No one loved life, laughter, and a good time more than Joan. We would have dinner and laugh and gossip and I always left the table smiling,” said journalist Barbara Walters.

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Comedian and entertainer Joan Rivers dies at age 81

No-holds-barred comedian Joan Rivers dies at age 81

By Patricia Reaney NEW YORK (Reuters) – Joan Rivers, the pioneering comedian known for her acerbic wit, classic put-downs and for asking "Can we talk?," died on Thursday at the age of 81 in a New York hospital a week after her heart stopped during an outpatient medical procedure. Melissa Rivers, the comedian's only child, said her mother died peacefully, surrounded by family and friends, at 1:17 …

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No-holds-barred comedian Joan Rivers dies at age 81