Temple Of The Arts Rabbi David Baron Among Five Honored By Congress For Jewish Heritage Month

Posted Friday, May 23 1:42 PM

Pictured from left: Sen. John McCain, Hassan Ali bin Ali, businessman, philanthropist and international chairman of the Shimon Peres Gold Medal Commemoration Committee; Rabbi David Baron and Rep. Joe Kennedy.

Leading Senators including Kelly Ayotte (R-NH), John McCain (R-AZ), Ben Cardin (D-MD), Rand Paul (R-KY), Bill Nelson ( D-FL), Roger Wicker (R-MS),and Representatives Joe Kennedy (D-MA), Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL), Ed Royce, Chairman of the House of Foreign Affairs Committee (R-CA), and Elliot Engel (D-NY) gathered this month to celebrate the Jewish American Heritage Month in the LBJ Room of the US Capitol.

The annual event, the Jewish American Heritage Month, organized by The Friedlander group, and approved by Congress, highlighted the work of five honoree chosen for their contributions and achievements.

Rabbi David Baron, leader of the U.S.s largest arts and entertainment-industry synagogue, Beverly Hills Temple of the Arts, was honored as an innovator in Jewish life, promoting religion through the arts. He also serves as chair of the Clergy Cabinet of the Shimon Peres Congressional Gold Medal Committee and was recognized for his efforts leading to the Senates passage of the award legislation.

The program also served as the Shimon Peres Congressional Gold Medal tribute luncheon celebrating the Senates passage 100-0 of legislation that recognizes Israeli President Shimon Peress lifelong commitment to the U.S.-Israel relationship and the Congress endorsement of a mutually beneficial U.S.-Israel relationship.

Also honored was: Temple of the Arts supporter Joseph H. Kanter, a businessman and philanthropist who received the Lifetime Achievement Award. Senator Bill Nelson highlighted his relationship with and the work of honoree Kanter and the Joseph H. Kanter Family Foundation.

Other honorees included: Lesley Weiss, chair of the U.S. Commission for the Preservation of Americas Heritage Abroad, appointed by President Obama; and Sanford A. Rubenstein of the law firm of Rubenstein & Rynecki, who has defended victims of personal injury and civil rights abuse for more than 40 years.

In tribute to MedReviews 40 years of service as an independent review organization, Joseph B. Stamm, CEO, was also honored.

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Temple Of The Arts Rabbi David Baron Among Five Honored By Congress For Jewish Heritage Month

Jay Leno Presents Michael Bloomberg With 'Jewish Nobel Prize' in Israel

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jay Leno, left, and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

More than three months after hanging up his hat as host of NBCs The Tonight Show, Jay Leno has found a new holy audience for his comedic chops.

The 64-year-old late-night alum made his inaugural visit to Israel this week, where he hosted the first annual Genesis Prize ceremony, held in Jerusalem. The first-ever recipient of what has been dubbed “the Jewish Nobel Prize” is a fellow high-profile figure who exited his own public position this past year: former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg.

The main event during the Thursday night ceremony saw Jewish-American business magnate Bloomberg awarded the Genesis Prize, which came with $1 million, which he announced he will use to establish a new fellowship under the auspices of the Genesis Philanthropy Group. Meanwhile, Lenos emceeing duties included his very familiar monologue setup, starting with him noting that the event was not unlike most Hollywood award shows, only with fewer Jews.

STORY: Jay Leno Joins Feminists at Beverly Hills Hotel Protest

Leno’s mostly political quips included references to ongoing media reports about the tenuous relationship between President Obama and Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, reminding the audience that May is Jewish American Heritage Month in the U.S., with Obama “calling it an opportunity to renew our unbreakable bond with the nation of Israel. And he knows its unbreakable, because hes been trying to break it for the last five years.

Leno also joked about U.S. Secretary of State John Kerrys role in trying to broker peace talks between Israelis and Palestinians in recent months, explaining he did some research ahead of his visit: According to the Central Bureau of Statistics, here in Israel the most popular boys name is Noam. Noam is the most popular boys name in the country. The least popular boy’s name? John Kerry.

Leno also familiarized himself with local indicted headline makers for his monologue, taking shots at former Israeli president Moshe Katsav, who is currently serving a seven-year sentence for rape, indecent acts, sexual harassment and obstruction of justice, saying Israel had some great leaders: David Ben Gurion, Golda Meir, Menachem Begin, Yitzhak Rabin. People were really touched by them. Well, of course, not as many people as were touched by former President Katsav.

A more recent aim was former prime minister Ehud Olmert, sentenced earlier this month to six years in prison on two counts of bribery. You guys are tough, quipped Leno. You sentenced your former prime minister to six years in prison — did you hear Olmerts defense? Not the best strategy. He blamed the whole thing on the Jews.

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Jay Leno Presents Michael Bloomberg With 'Jewish Nobel Prize' in Israel

Leno Roasts Obama, Kerry at Israeli Award Ceremony

Jay Leno spoke at an awards ceremony in Israel this week that honored Michael Bloomberg, and Leno made a few jokes roasting President Obamas administration for how its handled the U.S.s special relationship with Israel.

Leno joked, President Obama has declared the month of May Jewish American Heritage Month. He is calling it an opportunity to renew our unbreakable bond with the nation of Israel. And he knows its unbreakable because hes been trying to break it for the last five years. (According to Haaretz, this got the biggest laughter and applause of the night.)

Leno also had some fun with the Cabinet member who recently stirred up some trouble with Israel, quipping that the least popular name in the state of Israel is now John Kerry.

The former late night comic, of course, poked fun at Israeli politicians as well, including the surprising number of them whove been jailed.

[h/t POLITICO] [image via screengrab]

Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac

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Leno Roasts Obama, Kerry at Israeli Award Ceremony

In Israel, Leno pokes Obama, Kerry

Jay Leno might be gone from late night, but he still had some material for an event in Israel ribbing President Barack Obama and the Mideast peace process.

Obama has declared the month of May Jewish American Heritage Month. He is calling it an opportunity to renew our unbreakable bond with the nation of Israel, Leno said Thursday at an event honoring Michael Bloomberg. And he knows its unbreakable because hes been trying to break it for the last five years.

Leno spoke at the event, where Bloomberg was given the first Genesis Prize by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, according to Haaretz. The award honors a person who has excelled in their professional field and embodies the character of the Jewish people.

(Also on POLITICO: Study: Bill Clinton was Jay Leno top target)

The former host of NBCs The Tonight Show also made a joke at the expense of Secretary of State John Kerry, who recently walked back comments last month in which he said Israel risks becoming an apartheid state.

Ive been doing my research. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics, here in Israel, the most popular boys name is Noam. Noam is the most popular boys name in the country. The least popular boys name? John Kerry, Leno joked.

Leno often took some humorous jabs at the president, which Obama acknowledged as part of a reel he appeared in February, alongside other stars, honoring Lenos send-off from the late-night program.

(PHOTOS: Pols on late-night talk shows)

Jay, youve made a whole lot of jokes about me over the years, but do not worry: Im not upset, Obama said in the video. On a totally unrelated note, Ive decided to make you my new ambassador to Antarctica. Hope you got a warm coat, funny man.

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In Israel, Leno pokes Obama, Kerry

L.A. Celebrates the 70th Anniversary of D-Day on June 6, 2014

VAN NUYS, Calif., May 21, 2014 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) — Celebrated philanthropists Jane and Bert Boeckmann of Galpin Ford and the Heritage League of the Second Air Division, announced today they have joined forces to honor WWII Veterans at the 70th Anniversary D-Day Luncheon at the 94th Aero Squadron in Van Nuys on Friday, June 6, 2014 at 10 a.m. All WWII Veterans, friends and family are encouraged and invited to attend.

Led by Master of Ceremonies and “Glee” star, Bill Jones, the program includes the French Consul General of Los Angeles, M. Axel Cruau, and WWII Jewish-French spy and author of Behind Enemy Lines, Marthe Cohn, among other notable dignitaries.

The event commemorates the 70th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion of Normandy, when American and British forces attacked German-occupied France during World War II on June 6, 1944. Fourteen B-24 bomb groups of the Second Air Division, along with the B-17′s of the First and Third Bomb Divisions of the 8th Air Force, dealt a crippling blow to the German military-industrial complex.

Although the war would continue, the D-Day invasion marked the downfall of Germany’s ‘Thousand Year Reich’ and the beginning of the victory for the Allies in Europe. Nazi Germany surrendered less than a year later.

For more information and luncheon tickets please contact D-Day Event Chairman, Peggy Learman at (818) 366-6972 or whiteplains38@aol.com or visit http://www.ddayanniversaryla.com/ .

About The Heritage League:

The Heritage League (or HL) was established in 1987 by its parent organization, the Second Air Division Association (or 2ADA). The HL mission is educating following generations about the sacrifices of our forbears of the Bomb and Fighter Group Second Air Division in WW II. We do this through informative publications, presentations, this website and a host of other social and educational programs. We actively support related efforts such as the “living legacy” Second Air Division USAAF Memorial Library, in Norwich, England, The 8th AF Historical Society, and the Mighty Eighty Air Force Heritage Museum near Savannah. Our mission is big, challenging, and exciting. We want your energy, vision and talent. The Heritage League is a501(c)3 nonprofit org. More information: http://www.heritageleague.org/.

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L.A. Celebrates the 70th Anniversary of D-Day on June 6, 2014

West students begin setting up hate speech museum exhibit

The culmination of months of hard work and research came to a head Tuesday for a group of Billings West High students as they began setting up a museum exhibit they created on hate speech and hate crimes in Billings.

About 20 students from Bruce Wendts combined American history-English class spent the afternoon at the Western Heritage Center, setting up their exhibit in half of the buildings basement. The exhibit uses a series of hate-related incidents in the early 1990s including white supremacist activities, the throwing of a brick through a young Jewish boys window and Billings ensuing stand against hate crimes that sparked the Not In Our Town movement as a jumping-off point to examine hate crimes in the area.

When it first started, it was hard to envision, said Tim Dutton, a junior in the class. But weve put in a lot of work and its all coming together really nicely.

The multimedia project, called Community Storytelling Partnership, is a collaboration between School District 2, the Western Heritage Center, Montana PBS and the Billings Public Library.

It features filmed interviews with about a dozen people who were either involved in the movement that sparked NIOT or were around when it happened or deal with similar modern-day hate issues. The exhibit also has displays, photographs and historical documents that challenge viewers to think about hate in their own lives.

That includes old flyers and posters from hate groups, as well as news clippings spanning decades in Billings.

Students said that when they first started, they werent too sure what to do with the project the guidelines were intentionally vague to let the students explore the assignment but soon began to refine and shape it.

The cool thing about this is theyre solving the problems on their own, said Julie Dial, who helped the class throughout the project and is the Western Heritage Centers executive director.

While the museums basement walls were bare on Tuesday, the students quickly went about changing that, prepping it for mirrors, lights, photos and other parts of the exhibit, including a pair of videos of the interviews.

They spent the day building and painting exhibits, but also had the chance to reflect on what theyd done so far.

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West students begin setting up hate speech museum exhibit

Here and Now

NEW YORK —

THIS WEEK on Here and Now: May 18th, 2014

Coming up on Here and Now, award-winning actress S. Epatha Merkerson taking on an important new role that’s more fact that fiction: “America’s Diabetes Challenge – Get to Your Goals!”

We’ll introduce you to a dedicated midwife who’s saving the lives of babies under extreme circumstances in Uganda.

And: we’ll fill you in on the health risk linked to gum disease and how a hi-tech treatment is getting to the root of the problem.

Later, a coversation with producer and actress, Sheryl Lee Raplh, about her latest project that brings the life of flambouyant disco star “Sylvester” to the stage.

But first, we’re turning our attention to the kidnapping off nearly 300 young girls. They were taken from their boarding school in Nigeria by an extremist group known as Boko Haram. The mass abduction has sparked outrage and protest worldwide, including here in the tri-state area.

Joining us today is Aisha Al-Ada-Wee-Ya, founder of “Women in Islam, Inc”…an organization that focuses on human rights and social justice.

Recently on Here and Now: May 11th, 2014

Happy Mother’s Day! Coming up on Here and Now, one woman’s mission to save impoverished children in Rwanda.

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Here and Now

Moving and Shaking: Obama at Shoah Foundation, Righteous Among the Nations Award given

President Barack Obama is presented with the Ambassador for Humanity Award by filmmaker Steven Spielberg at the USC Shoah Foundations 20th anniversary gala in Los Angeles on May 7. Photo by Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Recalling the horrors of the Holocaust, President Barack Obama urged nations to fight growing anti-Semitism and threats against Israel in his remarks on May 7 to 1,200 supporters of the University of Southern California Shoah Foundation. Obama called for confronting a rising tide of anti-Semitism around the world.

We see attacks on Jews in the streets of major Western cities, public places marred by swastikas, he continued. From some foreign governments we hear the worst kind of anti-Semitic scapegoating.

At the same time, Its up to us to speak out against rhetoric that threatens the existence of the Jewish homeland and to sustain Americas unshakable commitment to Israels security, Obama declared to loud applause.

The gala at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza marked the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Shoah Foundation by filmmaker Steven Spielberg, following the international success of his Holocaust movie, Schindlers List.

Spielberg presented the Ambassador for Humanity Award to Obama at the event, which raised $4 million for the foundations work in compiling video testimonies of 52,000 Holocaust survivors, liberators and other witnesses. The work is continuing with testimonies from the last survivors of the 1915 genocide of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire and of the Japanese massacre of Chinese in Nanjing in 1937. More recent testimonies are being collected from survivors of mass killings in Cambodia and Rwanda.

Stressing the importance of these testimonies collected by the Shoah Foundation, Obama said, The purpose of memory is not simply to preserve the past, it is to protect the future. We can teach our children the hazards of tribalism. We can teach our children to speak out against the casual slur.

Bruce Springsteen, the evenings musical entertainment, earned a standing ovation from an audience sprinkled with Hollywoods heaviest hitters for his renditions of The Promised Land and Dancing in the Dark.

TV host and comedian Conan OBrien served as the evenings host and suggested that given the massive traffic jams caused by security for the presidents visit, perhaps he could just send his message by Skype the next time around. Praising the Shoah Foundations work, OBrien deadpanned that it was recording evidence of intolerance long before Donald Sterlings girlfriend.

Even with the array of eloquent speakers, they were almost upstaged by Celina Biniaz, who was the youngest person included on Schindlers famous list.

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Moving and Shaking: Obama at Shoah Foundation, Righteous Among the Nations Award given

Each May, Jewish history and American history collide

By Robert Gluck/JNS.org

Dr. Gary P. Zola sees an inextricable connection between American Jewish history, American history, and global Jewish history.

The study of the Jewish experience in the context of the American nation sheds light on the story of the nation itself, Zola, executive director of the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives, told JNS.org. Jews played an inordinately large role in shaping the character of American culture and heritage. The opportunities Jews had to contribute to and participate in the American experiment constitute a unique phenomenon in all of Jewish life in Diaspora.In this way, the study of the American Jewish experience represents a remarkable chapter in the history of world Jewry itself.

May is Jewish American Heritage Month (JAHM). In 2006, President George W. Bush following the efforts of U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL), the late U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA), the Jewish Museum of Florida, and others in South Floridas Jewish community proclaimed the months 31 days as an official recognition of more than 350 years of Jewish American achievements and contributions to the United States.

JAHMs theme this year is American Jews and tikkun olam (repairing the world), andalong those lines, its 2014 iteration honors the 100th anniversary of a humanitarian group the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC).

JAHM is pleased to partner in this milestone year with JDC, which remains the essential Jewish international humanitarian organization, putting into action the precept that all Jews are responsible for one another and for all humankind, said Abby Schwartz, national coordinator for JAHM. Since JDCs founding in 1914 at the outset of World War I, the organizations 10 decades of rescue, poverty alleviation, Jewish community development, leadership training, social innovation, anddisaster relief work has benefited millions of people and transformed countless lives in Israel and more than 90 countries.

OnAugust 18, 2010, the2006 proclamation from President George W. Bush that created Jewish American Heritage Month (JAHM) is presented by NASA astronaut Dr. Garrett E. Reisman to Marcia Jo Zerivitz , founding executive director of the Jewish Museum of Florida, at a ceremony at the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia. In May 2010, the JAHM proclamation traveled4,879,978 miles with 186 orbits of the earth aboard the U.S. space shuttleAtlantis. Credit: Courtesy Marcia Jo Zerivitz and Garrett Reisman.

Marcia Jo Zerivitz, founding executive director of the Jewish Museum of Florida, has been involved in JAHM since the inception of the idea. She was the one who originally spoke to Wasserman Schultz about getting the national month officially designated.

Zerivitz noted that more than 100 years ago, famed American author Mark Twain, in an essay titled Concerning the Jews, suggested that Jews ought hardly to be heard of because of their minimal numbers. Yet Jews have always been heard of, Twain wrote.

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Each May, Jewish history and American history collide

Calendar

Ongoing

Legacy Market is held 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays at The Legacy shopping center, 1902 N.E. Loop 1604. Live music and other special activities are offered Saturdays at the market. Visit: www.legacyfarmersmarket.com or www.facebook.com/LegacyFarmersMarket.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14

A general meeting of the Rose Treiman Group of Hadassah will be held at 11:30 a.m. at Sarita’s restaurant, 2235 Lockhill Selma Road. It will cost $15 including the meal, which has two options. For more information, call Ruth at 694-7552 or Micki at 824-4178.

Culinaria San Antonio, a weeklong, citywide, annual festival that celebrates local restaurants and cuisine, presents the Food Truck Event 6-9 p.m. at H-E-B Alon Market, 10003 N.W. Military Highway. More than a dozen local food trucks will cook up two of their most popular dishes.Admission: $10 advance for ages 21-older ($20 at the door); $5 for under 21, free for 5 and under. Admission includes event entry and beverages; food from the trucks must be bought separately. Visit: http://culinariasa.org.

Thursday, May 15

A public meeting on the proposed improvements for Gold Canyon Park will be held from 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. at Redland Oaks Elementary School, 16650 Redland Road. City Councilman Joe Krier is sponsoring the meeting with the city’s Transportation & Capital Improvements Department and its Parks & Recreation Department. The improvements are part of the city’s 2012-2017 bond program. For more information, call 207-6924.

SATURDAY, MAY 17

The 5th annual Jag-A-Thon 5K/10K fun walk and run will be held with registration and packet pick-up at 7 a.m. at Johnson High School, 23203 Bulverde Road. The run put on by the school’s athletic booster club is one of two major fundraisers that benefit athletic programs at Johnson. Registration is $25 or $35 the day of the race for the 5K and $30 or $40 the day of the race for the 10K. Children under 10 can participate for $10. For more information and registration details, go to www.jaguarpride.org.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month will be celebrated with a free tea tasting from 2:30-4 p.m. at Brook Hollow Branch Library, 530 Heimer Road.

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2 towns, 2 contrasting takes on tolerance

Listen Story audio 5min 21sec

First of a two-part report.

The neo-Nazi charged with killing three people at Jewish centers outside Kansas City last month drove there from his home in the Ozarks, a hilly, rural, largely conservative part of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas with a history of attracting white supremacists.

The Kansas murders sparked a painful discussion in the shooter’s community in Marionville, Mo., where bigotry is an especially divisive subject.

“I am not blind to the shortcomings of this area, and I will tell you, as a native, we are still mired in the past,” says Nancy Allen, a professor and author in nearby Springfield, Mo.

Allen says most black residents fled Springfield after three black men were lynched on the town square in 1906. That left it a largely white city in a very white region endowed with a fiercely independent and insular culture. Allen calls it the “code of the hills.”

Recently, the former mayor of Marionville was pressured to resign days after delivering this sound bite on TV: “Things going on in this country that’s destroying us. We’ve got a false economy, and some of those corporations are run by Jews.”

Visiting his town, you can see why he might be looking for someone to blame for its decline. Marionville has lost its university and factories that once employed hundreds. Downtown is boarded up.

The neo-Nazi accused of the shootings in suburban Kansas City a man known here as Frazier Glenn Miller bought a house nearby more than 20 years ago and made some friends.

“Yes sir, I knew him, real nice guy. He’d help somebody. He helped me quite a few times. Real nice guy,” says Jason Click as he sits behind the wheel of a big old pickup with a rebel flag on the ceiling. He says bigotry Miller’s or the former mayor’s doesn’t faze him.

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2 towns, 2 contrasting takes on tolerance

For Two Ozarks Communities, A Stark Contrast In Culture

Jason Click, a friend to and neighbor to Glenn Miller, who is suspected in three murders last month near Kansas City.

The neo-Nazi charged with killing three people at Jewish centers outside Kansas City last month drove there from his home in the Ozarks, a hilly, rural, largely conservative part of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas with a history of attracting white supremacists.

The Kansas murders sparked a painful discussion in the shooter’s community in Marionville, Mo., where bigotry is an especially divisive subject.

“I am not blind to the shortcomings of this area, and I will tell you, as a native, we are still mired in the past,” says Nancy Allen, a professor and author in nearby Springfield, Mo.

Allen says most black residents fled Springfield after three black men were lynched on the town square in 1906. That left it a largely white city in a very white region endowed with a fiercely independent and insular culture. Allen calls it the “code of the hills.”

Recently, the former mayor of Marionville, Mo., was pressured to resign days after delivering this sound bite on TV: “Things going on in this country that’s destroying us. We’ve got a false economy, and some of those corporations are run by Jews.”

Visiting his town you can see why he might be looking for someone to blame for its decline. Marionville has lost its university and factories that once employed hundreds. Downtown is a boarded-up shell.

The neo-Nazi accused of the shootings in suburban Kansas City a man known here as Frazier Glenn Miller bought a house nearby more than 20 years ago and made some friends.

“Yes sir, I knew him, real nice guy. He’d help somebody. He helped me quite a few times. Real nice guy,” says Jason Click as he sits behind the wheel of a big old pickup with a rebel flag on the ceiling. He says bigotry Miller’s or the former mayor’s doesn’t faze him.

“To each their own I reckon. If that’s how you feel, then that’s how you feel. You shouldn’t be mad because their opinion’s different than yours,” Click says.

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For Two Ozarks Communities, A Stark Contrast In Culture

Jewish-American Heritage Month 2014: American Heritage …

Jewish-American Heritage Month 2014.

because during native american heritage month your teachers are too busy teaching about damned pilgrims.

america does not honor or even respect the indigenous peoples here so keep your token month. until there is justice there will be no peace.

Is it relevant that in April Obama made a Presidential Proclamation – Jewish American Heritage Month, May 2011? read more…

That’s is against the Constitution. He is favoring one religion to the other. The government is not supposed to do that. Where is my Christian Heritage month?

What other ethnicities get a month to celebrate their contributions to America?

FEBRUARY

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Jewish-American Heritage Month 2014: American Heritage …

100 years on Orchard Street

Historic New Haven synagogue celebrates a milestone

By Cindy Mindell

Credit: Samantha Annette Photography

NEW HAVEN A decade ago, the handful of elderly members still davening at Congregation Beth Israel, founded in 1913, never thought their congregation would make it to its 90th birthday. Known as the Orchard Street Shul, the Colonial Revival-style traditional Orthodox synagogue built in 1926 and listed on the Connecticut State Register of Historic Places and the National Register of Historic Places, is the only structure of its kind in the region.

But with the building and membership in poor condition, it looked like the one-time anchor of New Havens thriving Oak Street-Legion Avenue Jewish neighborhood might have to be mothballed or sold.

In 2009, a revival began to take shape. Diehard supporters and the Cultural Heritage Artists Project worked to preserve the landmark building and keep it relevant to the Jewish community, raising funds for the renovations that would allow for High Holiday services in 2012.

Rabbi Mendy Hecht became the third generation of his family to serve the congregation as spiritual leader. He started adult education classes, regular Shabbat services with an enviable kiddush, and a monthly Friday night minyan. Numbers increased, the age range stretching to include teens and college students along with the longtime seniors and even nonagenarians.

This month, the Orchard Street Shul marks the 100th anniversary of Congregation Beth Israel, a milestone that defies the cumulative effect of urban renewal and white flight of the 60s and 70s, an aging congregation, and dwindling synagogue affiliation of the 90s and beyond.

New Haven has a special Jewish history and this is the last piece left of that community and time, says Hecht. The fact that were able to use it is very special, and its really cool to be part of something that has meant so much to so many people.

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100 years on Orchard Street

Getty gives $5 million to plan next PST, on Latino/Latin American art

Fueled by $5 million in grants from the J. Paul Getty Trust, 42 museums and other arts institutions from San Diego to Santa Barbara have begun tracing the prominent Latino and Latin American strand in Southern Californias cultural DNA, including how Latinos in L.A. and elsewhere in the United States have absorbed, reflected and grappled with the creative legacies of their mother countries.

The fruits of the planning and research thats now underway will be harvested starting in September 2017, when Pacific Standard Time: Los Angeles/Latin America begins a five-month run at museums, universities and performance spaces around the region.

The focus on Latino and Latin American art and culture is Round 3 in the Pacific Standard Time initiative that the Getty, the worlds richest visual art institution, began laying groundwork for in 2002.

The first effort, Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980 in 2011, documented how individual artists and institutions helped make L.A. and its environs a global force in the art world in the decades after World War II.

The 2011 initiative was a unique attempt at uniting dozens of arts institutions for a sprawling, panoramic and multifaceted view of themes in visual art that have particular relevance for Southern California.

The Getty kicked in $11.1 million in grants for that first chapter. Last years Pacific Standard Time: Modern Architecture in L.A. used an additional $3.6 million in Getty grants to consider architecture alone.

On Tuesday the Getty plans to announce the first round of grants for Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, as its known for short. It also provided brief summaries of the exhibitions, film screenings and performances its funding.

In many cases the focus will be narrow, sometimes on a single artist. But collectively, LA/LA aims to offer a wide-angle, panoptical view of the art Latinos have created in Southern California and elsewhere in the United States, together with creative paths forged in Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean.

The exhibitions will range from 1000 BC — the starting point for a show on Luxury Arts in the Ancient Americas that the Getty is organizing with New York Citys Metropolitan Museum of Art — to the speculative future, as manifested in Critical Utopias: The Art of Futurismo Latino, an exhibition at UC Riversides ARTSblock galleries on how science fiction has influenced the styles and sociopolitical visions of Latino and Latin American artists.

The Getty had announced the theme and title of LA/LA more than a year ago, but the grant announcements flesh out what will happen in 2017. So far, there will be 40 exhibitions, three film series and concerts by the Los Angeles Philharmonic at both the Hollywood Bowl and Walt Disney Concert Hall.

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Getty gives $5 million to plan next PST, on Latino/Latin American art