Jewish American Heritage Month 2014

May is Jewish American Heritage Month

The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Jewish Americans who have helped form the fabric of American history, culture and society. Read more

U.S. Army team searching for weapons of mass destruction discovered over 2,700 Jewish books and tens of thousands of documents. To provide accessibility throughout the world to the damaged materials, the US National Archives and Records Administration and its partners have preserved, cataloged, and digitized the books and documents. More about the preservation efforts

During World War II, American art historians, museum and art professionals, and archivists were deployed as military officers to protect historical monuments, art, and archives in war theaters throughout western Europe. These monuments men were part of the militarys Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives (MFAA) program. The National Gallery of Art played a seminal role in its creation. More about the Monuments Men

The National Gallery of Art recently unveiled a permanent and public home for the exquisite glass and stone mosaic Orphe, designed by Marc Chagall and bequeathed to the Gallery by arts patron Evelyn Stefansson Nef.

More about the Chagall mosaic

Fighting Nazi Germany took on special significance for one group of U.S. servicemen in the European Theater. Even those Jewish soldiers and sailors who were serving elsewhere in World War II understood that defeating the Axis would be a defeat for blind hatred of any ethnic group or nationality.

Visit the Online Exhibition

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Jewish American Heritage Month 2014

Why I hope my mixed-race son doesn't stay 'white'

parenting

Alina Adams TODAY contributor

13 hours ago

Last month on Ebony.com, a white father wrote that he hopes his biracial son will stay light-skinned and pass as white. The post went viral and triggered such an outcry that he followed it up with 7 Things I Can Do That My Black Son Cant.

As the white mother of three biracial African-American children, I can understand his fears about racism. But as someone whose oldest child is very light-skinned and blue-eyed, I have my reasons for why I hope he doesnt stay white.

Courtesy of Alina Adams

The author’s son with his father. Alina Adams, who is white, writes that she hopes her son’s skin gets darker so people perceive him as black.

My son is 15. This summer, he participated in a program to teach minority youth how to start their own businesses. At the end of it, my son told me hed never do another minority-oriented program again.

Im tired of being told I dont act black, I dont talk black, and I dont look black. Im sick of being told Im not actually black.

(My African-American husbands response was, I got the same thing because I spoke properly and did well in school. And I had two black parents. Suck it up.)

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Why I hope my mixed-race son doesn't stay 'white'

Jewish American Heritage Month | EDSITEment

Each May, EDSITEment celebrates Jewish American Heritage Month by pointing to the rich array of educational resources on this subject. Many of the programs listed below are films which appeared on PBS as stand-alone specials or as part of long-running series such as American Experience and American Masters. Many of them have been funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities over the past decades. Each of them is accompanied by a multimedia website or Web page, which extends the life of the program with video clips, images, and interactives that can be used by teachers in their classroom or students doing research.

The idea of America as both a haven and a home for the religious faiths of the myriad diverse groups who, over the centuries, have immigrated to the United States is one that deeply resonates with most Americans. The blessings of religious and political liberty that these immigrants found in America were captured eloquently in George Washingtons letter to the Hebrew Congregation at Newport, Rhode Island in 1790. In this letter, Washington quotes a sentence from the Book of Micah of the Hebrew Bible:

May the children of the stock of Abraham who dwell in this land continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other inhabitantswhile every one shall sit in safety under his own vine and fig tree and there shall be none to make him afraid.

A few sentences earlier Washington addresses American Jews as equal fellow citizens (the first time in history that any national leader had done so):

It is now no more that toleration is spoken of as if it were the indulgence of one class of people that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights, for, happily, the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.

Washington’s letter was in response to one written by Moses Seixas, Warden of the Jeshuat Israel Synagogue in Rhode Island. The EDSITEment-reviewed Bill of Rights Institute has a lesson in which students can read and compare the two letters via an interactive. A related lesson plan on Washington and Religious Liberty is available on the NEH-funded website Rediscovering George Washington. The principles of civil and religious liberty extolled in this letter and embodied in our Constitution encouraged and rewarded active participation in the social, political, and cultural life of the nation with results that can be celebrated in this feature.

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A good place to begin if one wants to understand Jewish life in America would be The Jewish Americans, recently broadcast on PBS stations and partially funded by NEH. This series offers a treasure trove of video clips, images, and student interactives on such topics as the Diaspora, which sent millions of Jews to the United States, the challenges of assimilation, the rise of immigrants from street peddlers on the lower East Side of New York city to sophisticated and wealthy merchants in the fashion industry, and the critical role that philanthropic organizations and education plays in the Jewish American community. The witty essayist Joseph Epstein wrote about this program in his article Hebrew National for Humanities magazine.

A related NEH-funded website Jews in America: Our Story documents the growth of the Jewish community from a group of 23 refugees fleeing from the Portuguese Inquisition in 1654. This comprehensive website on the history and culture includes an interactive historical timeline, with a gallery of over five hundred artifacts drawn from the library, archival, and museum collections of the Center for Jewish History and its partners. Another article from Humanities, Jewish Pioneers tells the stories of the new lives that European Jews made for themselves west of the Mississippi in the 19th century. According to one scholar there wasnt a single settlement west of the Mississippi of any significance which had not had a Jewish mayor in 1900.

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Jewish American Heritage Month | EDSITEment

Jewish American Heritage Month

Posted By admin on November 20, 2014

Wigan owner Dave Whelan has been accused of anti-Semitism as the controversy over the the clubs appointment of Malkay Mackay as manager deepens.

Read this article: Wigan chairman Dave Whelan accused of anti-Semitism

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Posted By admin on November 20, 2014

Dave Whelan, the multimillionaire owner of Wigan Athletic football club, has been accuse of anti-Semitism after he made comments to a national newspaper attempting to defend the appointment of Malky Mackay as manager. Wigan Athletic Chairman Dave Whelan with new manager Malky Mackay (left) following a press conference at the DW Stadium, Wigan Mackay is currently under investigation by the

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Posted By admin on November 20, 2014

LONDON (Reuters) Dave Whelan, owner of Championship club Wigan Athletic, has been accused of anti-Semitism and condoning racism after referring to Chinese as chinks and saying Jewish people chase

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Jewish American Heritage Month

Celebrating Judaism and Islam in America

51st Annual ISNA Convention August 29 – September 1, 2014 in Detroit, MI. Image via ISNA

What happens when Jewish and Muslim leaders set their minds to engage in dialogue, and then move beyond dialogue to social action, prayer and friendship? When we first met in February 2008, another question asked in good humor was, What took so long for us to meet?

Six years ago, the Jewish Theological Seminarys (JTS) Chancellor Arnold M. Eisen and Rabbi Burton L. Visotzky, director of the Milstein Center for Interreligious Dialogue of JTS, sat down with Dr. Sayyid Syeed and Dr. Mohamed Elsanousi of the Office of Interfaith and Community Alliances of the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA), to discuss plans for our future. We set an ambitious list of goals: matching 10 Conservative Jewish congregations with 10 mosques, surveying Conservative rabbis to see whether they were engaged in Muslim-Jewish dialogue, and developing a series of academic workshops to further Muslim-Jewish relations on campus and in the community.

We continued to talk throughout 2008, even as we matched congregations, discovered that more than 50 Conservative synagogues already had dialogue programs with the Muslim community, and planned the workshops we envisioned. With lead funding from the Carnegie Corp. of New York, we undertook a series of workshops on Judaism and Islam in America. The first of these was in fall 2010 at JTS, and the next at a partner institution, Hartford Seminary. We turned to Hartford, a Christian seminary, because it was already training Muslim leaders in its chaplaincy program, since there was no ordaining institution for imams in America. Hartfords interfaith-relations program was then being run by Dr. Ingrid Mattson, then president of ISNA. She and Hartfords President Heidi Hadsell rounded out the inner group to plan a project that answered the question that seemed to us so urgent: how can we take two similar American minority religious communities, Jews and Muslims, and get them to know one another?

It was as though the Quran (49:13) spoke to us: O humanity! We created you from a single male and female, and made you into tribes and nations, that you might know one another. Of course, this parallels the foundational rabbinic document, the Mishnah (Sanhedrin 4:5), which teaches: Thus was humanity made from a single being … to promote peace among Gods creatures, that no one may say, my ancestor was greater than yours. It was this tenet from both faiths that we might come to know one another without presuming that one of us was better than the other that drove and continues to drive the alliances and friendships we have forged for half a decade and more.

All in all, we held three workshops. The first two, at JTS and Hartford, yielded academic fruit; last month, Hartford Seminary published Volume 104 of the scholarly journal The Muslim World. For the first time in more than a century of publication, this special issue was dedicated to Judaism and Islam in America, containing articles by both Jews and Muslims. Two of us also did a one-day colloquium on Muslim and Jewish oral literature at Georgetown University. Scholars who were formerly wary of one another now eagerly traded footnotes. While the scholars wrote their articles, the fruits of our third workshop also blossomed. We met in fall 2012 in Northern Virginia and Washington, D.C. Jews and Muslims toured the White House together as a group, engaged in a briefing with the Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships there, and discussed at length how to take the bonds we had forged from classroom to community.

To achieve our goals of broadening and strengthening ties among the various Jewish and Muslim communities, we oversaw four pilot projects on the Eastern seaboard in synagogues and mosques, in local community centers, and on college campuses. These added to the already lengthy list of programs for Jews and Muslims taking place across North America. In fact, in addition to our pilot programs, we collated a list of other dialogue and social-action programs that had been successful promoting Muslim-Jewish interaction.

We commissioned a new book, Sharing the Well: A Resource Guide for Jewish-Muslim Engagement, edited by Kim Zeitman and Mohamed Elsanousi. Sharing the Well is designed to assist and enhance Jewish-Muslim interactions at the community level. It includes a guide to dialogue; 18 articles by Jewish and Muslim leaders on topics such as caring for others, family and heritage, and religious life; questions for discussion; the sampling of 24 successful Jewish-Muslim engagement programs from across America; and a glossary of Jewish and Muslim terms. The 150-page book will be available beginning in November 2015, as a free PDF download at www.jtsa.edu/sharingthewell. On that date, hard copies will also be available via order form.

It continues to be our hope that advancing the dialogue between Muslims and Jews in such an important way might also be an asset in helping build confidence toward a just solution in the Middle East. We do not expect to change decades of enmity overnight, but we do believe that building a strong alliance between the Muslim and Jewish communities for the purpose of fighting Islamophobia and anti-Semitism benefits us all, even as it also strengthens the fabric of the great patchwork quilt that is America.

Since we began the Judaism and Islam in America project, Jews have visited Muslim-majority countries, while Muslims have visited Holocaust sites in Europe and studied in Jerusalem. In the past half decade, we have moved from dialogue to action: working together to feed the hungry, providing free medical treatment to the uninsured and building housing for those in need. Sharing our stories with one another, asking after each others families, breaking bread together, jointly celebrating our holidays and expressing our condolences has become the daily round of what is now friendship. Each of us has been enriched by the other, better knowing our own religion and appreciating the beliefs and customs of the other. As the Quran (5:48) teaches, we race with one another to do good works.

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Celebrating Judaism and Islam in America

Jewish American Heritage Month – Wikipedia, the free …

Jewish American Heritage Month

President Obama welcomes guests to 2010 JAHM White House reception.

Jewish American Heritage Month (JAHM) is an annual recognition and celebration of Jewish American achievements in and contributions to the United States of America. It is observed annually in the U.S. during the month of May.[1]

JAHM was set into law by President George W. Bush in 2006, according to the Jewish American Heritage Month Coalition. This is the achievement of Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) and Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA), as well as the Jewish Museum of Florida and the South Florida Jewish Community.[2] A similar month exists in Florida as Florida Jewish History Month but it occurs in January.[3]

President George W. Bush announced that May would be Jewish American Heritage Month in April 2006. The announcement was an achievement in the effort of the Jewish Museum of Florida and South Florida Jewish Community leaders for a celebration of Jewish Americans and Jewish American Heritage.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) and Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA) urged the president to proclaim a month that would recognize the more than 350-year history of Jewish contributions to America and the American culture. The resolutions were passed unanimously, first in the United States House of Representatives in December 2005 and later in the United States Senate in February 2006.[4]

The Jewish American Heritage Month Coalition states that, “JAHM also enables the exploration of the meaning of religious pluralism, cultural diversity, and participation in American civic culture.”[5]

According to Library of Congress hosted website, JewishHeritageMonth.gov, May was chosen as the month of Jewish American Heritage Month because of the successful 350th Anniversary Celebration of Jews in America.[6]

Celebration of Jewish American Heritage Month is encouraged on a national level. In some schools, assemblies have been held in celebration.

JAHM has been recognized in Madison Square Garden in New York City. It has also been recognized in some Jewish museums. Additionally, some institutions, including the Library of Congress, have included shorter periods within the month for special lectures, programs, or displays, such as the Library of Congress “Jewish Heritage Week” lecture series.

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Jewish American Heritage Month 2014 November 19

admin | November 19, 2014

FORT GREENE, Brooklyn (PIX11) Most of this area south of the Brooklyn Navy Yard is zoned industrial. Waverly Avenue is dotted with warehouses, a dry cleaning plant, and some light manufacturing facilities.

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admin | November 19, 2014

FORT GREENE, Brooklyn (PIX11) Most of this area south of the Brooklyn Navy Yard is zoned industrial.

Category: Anti-Defamation League | Comments Off Tags: a-dry-cleaning, academy, and-some, avenue, brooklyn-, dry-cleaning, factory-building, fort, founded-on-the, the-middle, united, united-talmudic, waverly-avenue, zoned-industrial-

admin | November 19, 2014

FORT GREENE, Brooklyn (PIX11) Most of this area south of the Brooklyn Navy Yard is zoned industrial. Waverly Avenue is dotted with warehouses, a dry cleaning plant, and some light manufacturing facilities.

Category: Talmud | Comments Off Tags: a-dry-cleaning, academy, area, avenue, brooklyn-, brooklyn-navy, dry-cleaning, factory-building, fort, founded-on-the, light-manufacturing, the-middle, united-talmudic, waverly-avenue, zoned-industrial-

admin | November 19, 2014

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Jewish American Heritage Month 2014 November 19

May is Jewish American Heritage Month

By Congressional resolution and Presidential proclamation, MAY is Jewish American Heritage Month (JAHM).

A national month of recognition of the more than 350-year history of Jewish contributions to American culture, JAHM acknowledges the achievements of American Jews in fields ranging from sports and arts and entertainment to medicine, business, science, government, and military service.

The JAHM website is an interactive clearinghouse for events, programs, and activities nationwide and a resource for school and community leaders. Submit your events, sign up for email updates, and find out whats happening in your neighborhood and across the country.

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May is Jewish American Heritage Month

SikhLens, The Sikh Arts & Film Festival, Comes to its Home Base of Los Angeles

Orange, California (PRWEB) November 15, 2014

In an effort to strengthen the cultural understanding between Sikh Americans and their neighbors and raise awareness about a community with a more-than-125-year history in the United States, SikhLensa Sikh organization dedicated to increasing its communitys profile through the arts will host its sixth annual Sikh Arts & Film Festival 2014 starting Friday, November 21. Showcasing the work of artists from various media including film, literature, music, art, social media and fashion, SikhLens allows attendees to better understand Sikh culture, values, stories, and struggles.

Bicky Singh, SikhLens founder remarked, It has been an honor to showcase Sikh artists and filmmakers at SikhLens, which has become a global celebration of Sikh culture. Even more importantly, this festival creates bridges between communities. SikhLens now reaches the film directors and artists of the future, including students at the Chapman University’s Dodge College of Film and Media Arts.

At the Dodge College of Film and Media Arts, students create scholarship films, which are sponsored by Sikh patrons, philanthropists and other donors, in an effort to gain understanding of the Sikh community. The Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund (SALDEF)s Turban Myths study, done in conjunction with Stanford University researchers in 2013, found that the media played a role in bias against the Sikh articles of faith. Seventy percent of Americans cannot properly identify a Sikh American, and one in five have fear or apprehension when they see a Sikh American who is a stranger. Bicky Singh pioneered an ongoing partnership between SikhLens and the Dodge College of Film and Media Arts in order to ensure that future producers, directors, and media executives avoid the stereotyping and misunderstandings present against the Sikh articles of faith in major forms of media.

The three-day festival will begin with Creative Sikhs , a celebration of new talent, and end with the SikhLens Showcase, a never-before seen concert featuring Sikh musicians and performers. The program will be broken up into seven themed categories and highlight current social issues, films from varied genres, and talent.

DATE: Friday, November 21- Sunday November 23, 2014 WHERE: Dodge College of Film and Media Arts at Chapman University, Orange, CA TIMING: http://www.sikhlens.com (can be found under Films) MEDIA RSVP: Email media(at)sikhlens(dot)com Interviews and opportunities for photography are also available.

FEATURED FILMS: A Tribute, The story of Sikh soldiers during WW1, Saturday Nov 22, 2014, 10:00 a.m. Red, White and Beard, A short about Vishvajit Singh, a Sikh who challenges the concept of a hero, Nov 22, 2014, 10:00 a.m. Struggle to Serve, A documentary on the Sikh American struggle to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces, November 23, 2014 11:00 a.m. Kultars Mime, The hidden story of the 1984 Delhi pogroms as seen by a Jewish art collective, November 23, 2014, 3:00 p.m.

SikhLens also falls during Sikh Awareness Month in California. Sikh Americans have a rich heritage in The Golden State that dates back to the early 1900s. Milestones in the California Sikh communitys history includes the founding of the Stockton Gurdwara, the first Sikh house of worship in America, in 1912. Dalip Singh Saund, the first Asian American and Sikh American Congressman who hailed from California was once a secretary of that very Gurdwara.

ABOUT SIKHLENS Established in 2009, Sikhlens is a 100% volunteer run, non-profit organization that seeks to provide an outlet for sharing Sikh heritage, culture and talent with the rest of the world by creating awareness for work that is Sikh-centric. Follow SikhLens at #SFF2014 for updates from the festival.

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SikhLens, The Sikh Arts & Film Festival, Comes to its Home Base of Los Angeles

SikhLens, The Sikh Arts & Film Festival, Comes to its Home Base of Los Angeles

Orange, California (PRWEB) November 15, 2014

In an effort to strengthen the cultural understanding between Sikh Americans and their neighbors and raise awareness about a community with a more-than-125-year history in the United States, SikhLensa Sikh organization dedicated to increasing its communitys profile through the arts will host its sixth annual Sikh Arts & Film Festival 2014 starting Friday, November 21. Showcasing the work of artists from various media including film, literature, music, art, social media and fashion, SikhLens allows attendees to better understand Sikh culture, values, stories, and struggles.

Bicky Singh, SikhLens founder remarked, It has been an honor to showcase Sikh artists and filmmakers at SikhLens, which has become a global celebration of Sikh culture. Even more importantly, this festival creates bridges between communities. SikhLens now reaches the film directors and artists of the future, including students at the Chapman University’s Dodge College of Film and Media Arts.

At the Dodge College of Film and Media Arts, students create scholarship films, which are sponsored by Sikh patrons, philanthropists and other donors, in an effort to gain understanding of the Sikh community. The Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund (SALDEF)s Turban Myths study, done in conjunction with Stanford University researchers in 2013, found that the media played a role in bias against the Sikh articles of faith. Seventy percent of Americans cannot properly identify a Sikh American, and one in five have fear or apprehension when they see a Sikh American who is a stranger. Bicky Singh pioneered an ongoing partnership between SikhLens and the Dodge College of Film and Media Arts in order to ensure that future producers, directors, and media executives avoid the stereotyping and misunderstandings present against the Sikh articles of faith in major forms of media.

The three-day festival will begin with Creative Sikhs , a celebration of new talent, and end with the SikhLens Showcase, a never-before seen concert featuring Sikh musicians and performers. The program will be broken up into seven themed categories and highlight current social issues, films from varied genres, and talent.

DATE: Friday, November 21- Sunday November 23, 2014 WHERE: Dodge College of Film and Media Arts at Chapman University, Orange, CA TIMING: http://www.sikhlens.com (can be found under Films) MEDIA RSVP: Email media(at)sikhlens(dot)com Interviews and opportunities for photography are also available.

FEATURED FILMS: A Tribute, The story of Sikh soldiers during WW1, Saturday Nov 22, 2014, 10:00 a.m. Red, White and Beard, A short about Vishvajit Singh, a Sikh who challenges the concept of a hero, Nov 22, 2014, 10:00 a.m. Struggle to Serve, A documentary on the Sikh American struggle to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces, November 23, 2014 11:00 a.m. Kultars Mime, The hidden story of the 1984 Delhi pogroms as seen by a Jewish art collective, November 23, 2014, 3:00 p.m.

SikhLens also falls during Sikh Awareness Month in California. Sikh Americans have a rich heritage in The Golden State that dates back to the early 1900s. Milestones in the California Sikh communitys history includes the founding of the Stockton Gurdwara, the first Sikh house of worship in America, in 1912. Dalip Singh Saund, the first Asian American and Sikh American Congressman who hailed from California was once a secretary of that very Gurdwara.

ABOUT SIKHLENS Established in 2009, Sikhlens is a 100% volunteer run, non-profit organization that seeks to provide an outlet for sharing Sikh heritage, culture and talent with the rest of the world by creating awareness for work that is Sikh-centric. Follow SikhLens at #SFF2014 for updates from the festival.

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SikhLens, The Sikh Arts & Film Festival, Comes to its Home Base of Los Angeles

Jewish American Heritage Month: A Research Guide | Law …

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Back to Commemorative Observances

Jewish American Heritage Month is a month to celebrate the contributions Jewish Americans have made to America since they first arrived in New Amsterdam in 1654.

Jewish American Heritage Month had its origins in 1980 when Congress passed Pub. L. 96-237 which authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating a week in April or May as Jewish Heritage Week. President Carter issued this first proclamation, Presidential Proclamation 4752 (external link) in April 1980. In this proclamation President Carter spoke about the bountiful contributions made by the Jews to the culture and history of the United States. He also spoke of the significance of April 1980 in the Jewish calendar, which was the anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, Israeli Independence Day, and the Days of Remembrance of Victims and Survivors of the Holocaust.

Between 1981 and 1990, Congress annually passed public laws proclaiming a week in April or May as Jewish Heritage Week andPresidents Reagan and George H.W. Bush issued annual proclamations which detailed important events in the history of the Jews.

In 1991, Congress passed Pub. L. 102-30 which requested the President designate the weeks of April 14-21, 1991 and May 3-10, 1992 as Jewish Heritage Week. In 1993, Congress passed Pub. L. 103-27 which requested the President designate the weeks of April 25-May 2, 1993 and April 10-17, 1994 as Jewish Heritage Week. Presidents George H.W. Bush and Clinton then issued 3 presidential proclamations between 1991-1994 for Jewish Heritage Week.

Between 1995 and 2006, Presidents Clinton and George W. Bush issued a series of annual presidential proclamations designating a week in April or May of each year as Jewish Heritage Week. On April 24, 1998, President Clinton issued Presidential Proclamation 7087 which celebrates the many contributions of Jewish Americans along with the 50th Anniversary of the founding of the state of Israel.

Then on February 14, 2006, Congress issued House Concurrent Resolution 315 which stated:

Resolved … that Congress urges the President to issue each year a proclamation calling on State and local governments and the people of the United States to observe an American Jewish History Month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

Pursuant to this, on April 20, 2006 President Bush issued the first Presidential Proclamation which designated May 2006 as Jewish American Heritage Month. On May 12, 2009 President Obama issued the Presidential Proclamation 8379 (PDF) which speaks of how Jewish American story is an example of the diversity in America History that enriches and strengthens the whole society.

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Jewish American Heritage Month: A Research Guide | Law …

Alexandria-Arlington community events, Nov. 13 to 20, 2014

November 12

Thursday, Nov. 13

AARP smart driver class A two-day class. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday-Friday, Walter Reed Senior Center, 2909 S. 16th St., Arlington. $20; AARP members, $15. 703-228-0955.

Faith, Food and Fellowship A service with music, a message from a pastor, lunch and Michael MacCracken of the Climate Institute discusses Climate Change and Global Warming. Noon, Clarendon United Methodist Church, 606 N. Irving St., Arlington. Free; lunch, $5. 703-527-8574 or www.morefaith.org .

Alzheimers Association program A two-part series on Living With Alzheimers: For Late-Stage Caregivers, learn about resources, monitoring care and providing connection for the person with late-stage and their families. 1-2:30 p.m. Thursday and Nov. 20, Goodwin House, 4800 Fillmore Ave., Alexandria. Free; registration required. 800-272-3900.

Diabetic Eye Disease Reshma Katira of the Retina Group of Washington discusses the causes, symptoms and treatment. 1:30-3 p.m., Charles E. Beatley Library, 5005 Duke St., Alexandria. Free; registration required. 703-746-1762 or www.youreyes.org .

Post-Photography: Beyond the Print 15 artists use alternative applications of traditional photographic images through wood, glass, fabric and other media. Reception, 6-8 p.m. Thursday. Through Nov. 30. Torpedo Factory Art Center, Target Gallery, 105 N. Union St., Alexandria. Free. 703-838-4565, Ext. 4 or www.torpedofactory.org .

Second Thursday Art Night Browse open studios and galleries, meet artists and attend a reception at Target Gallery (6 p.m.) and performance by Jane Franklin Dance, (7 p.m.). 6-9 p.m., Torpedo Factory Art Center, 105 N. Union St., Alexandria. Free. 703-838-4565 or www.torpedofactory.org .

Figure drawing workshop Draw or paint a live models long pose. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Thursday and Wednesday, Del Ray Artisans, Nicholas A. Colasanto Center, 2704 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria. $10-$12. 703-836-1468 or www.thedelrayartisans.org .

Arlington Central Library plant clinic Gardening questions answered by Virginia Cooperative Extension master gardeners. 6:45-8:45 p.m., Arlington Central Library, 1015 N. Quincy St. Free. 703-228-6400 or mgarlalex@gmail.com .

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Alexandria-Arlington community events, Nov. 13 to 20, 2014

Tristan Walker: The Visible Man

Tristan Walker is in the house.

He is posted up in the vestibule of the Fox Theatre in Redwood City, California, where the hottest venture-capital firm in Silicon Valley, Andreessen Horowitz, has just hosted a screening of a new documentary starring the rapper Nas. Nas is here, too, but from the way Tristan Walker works the crowd of nearly 1,000, you’d think it was his premiere. Sporting a light-gray Bailey fedora and a speckled charcoal sweatshirt bearing the logo of his new startup, Walker & Company Brands, the debonair 30-year-old dives into the masses, vanishes, reemerges in a corner deep in conversation, and makes introductions all around, exclaiming, “You two should meet!” During a stationary second, a young black man who can’t be more than 20 years old walks over. “I’ve been following your moves,” he says. “And I’ve been really inspired by you.”

Walker is a celebrity in Silicon Valley, known primarily for his success and creativity as head of business development at Foursquare, which he joined in 2009 and left in 2012. Foursquare was one of the original location-based “check-in” apps, and Walker put the startup on the map by landing hundreds of partnerships with merchants and brands such as American Express and BravoTV. His regular appearances at South by Southwest, on television, and on Twitterwhere he’s garnered an audience of nearly 300,000 followerspromoted both Foursquare and Walker himself. By the time he left to become entrepreneur-in-residence at Andreessen Horowitz, everyone wondered, “What’s next for Tristan?” Walker’s hustle and charisma aren’t the only reasons for his fame. Walker is black. In Silicon Valley, even in 2014, a visible, successful African-American is big news. The technology industry’s lack of minority representation is deplorable. Venture capitalists, startup founders, and big-time CEOs like to brag that the tech business is a color-blind meritocracy, but their boasts don’t reflect the facts.

The truth hit like cannon blasts this past summer, when tech’s largest firms released figures on the racial and ethnic makeup of their companies. They’d kept this data hidden for years, insisting that it was a “trade secret,” but they finally yielded under pressure from civil rights activist Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. and others. Google was the first, revealing that out of its 46,000 employees, just 2%and just 1% of its technology workforceare black. Next up was Yahoo: 12,300 employees, 1% of its tech workforce, are black. Facebook? You guessed it: 1%. Apple’s total workforce is 7% blackbut, of course, Apple has 425 retail locations. In case you were wondering, blacks make up 13% of the U.S. population. “The fact of the matter is, there are a lot of qualified people of color out there, who can and should be working in the tech industry,” says David Drummond, senior vice president of corporate development and chief legal officer at Google. “Releasing the numbers creates the opportunity for us to make this more visible, and to do something about it.”

While Drummond is, arguably, the highest-ranking black executive at a major company in the Valley, Walker is its highest-profile African-American startup founder and CEO. And he has set Walker & Co. on a decidedly unorthodox course for a Silicon Valley enterprise.

As he tries to turn this startup into what he considers a great company, Walker will face all the usual obstacles that confront a young entrepreneur. But he will also be carving out a narrative with unique challenges. More often than not, the tech industry’s heroes are boyish white males from wealthy suburban enclavesthe Zuckerbergs, Dorseys, and Systroms. Despite the fact that African-Americans have risen to the highest levels of every other aspect of business and popular culture, not a single black entrepreneur has attained that level of success and influence in tech. Against considerable odds, Walker is working to rewrite that playbook, even if his startup has a modest $9.3 million in funding. If Walker can build a world-changing business, he will serve as an extraordinary role model for younger African-Americans. And perhaps he will prove to those who hold the keys to the Valley’s kingdom that those coming behind him, and those who haven’t benefited from the kind of exposure he has garnered, are worthy of much more than the cursory glance they are now given. As if proof should be necessary.

Walker’s challenge is multiplied by his unusual goal for his company. Walker & Co. isn’t an app; it won’t make you instantly famous for kooky videos; it doesn’t even automate anything in your life. Instead, Walker & Co. aims to be the “Procter & Gamble for people of color.” While the company is armed with Silicon Valley money and infused with Silicon Valley concepts of design and startup culture, it will try to create health and beauty products for minorities, solving problems overlooked by the reigning consumer-goods giants. Its first product is a single-blade razor system, called Bevel, which makes it possible for men with coarse or curly hairthe kind that I and most other black men haveto shave without developing razor bumps or other skin irritation.

Can a razor be the foundation of a great business? Can it lure young black men and women to Silicon Valley? Can it be a catalyst for real change?

Walker knows that his every move will be closely dissected, given his status. While he is adept at turning on the networking charm when necessary, he is not naturally at ease with such public attention. “Man, that is not my scene,” Walker says, slowing to a red light on a desolate highway after we leave the Nas screening. “I don’t really go to those events by myself, unless I’m accepting an award or coming out to show support. Or if I’m with my friends. What am I going to talk to people about?”

Age: 30 Childhood home: South Jamaica Houses, Queens, New York Current home: Palo Alto Education: New York City public schools Hotchkiss School, 19982002 SUNY Stony Brook, 20022005, class valedictorian Stanford Graduate School of Business, 20082010, MBA

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Tristan Walker: The Visible Man

Jewish American Heritage Month leeha

admin | November 8, 2014

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admin | November 8, 2014

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Jewish American Heritage Month leeha

Hometown News Calendar for Week of November 9, 2014

VETERANS DAY

Veterans Day Assembly. 9 a.m. Tue. Community members and veterans invited. Moorestown Athletic Center (MAC), Moorestown High School, 350 Bridgeboro Rd. 856-778-6610

Mt Holly Veterans Day Service. 11 a.m. Tue. To honor all vets, several guest speakers and Commanders from American Legion and the VFW. Veterans Park, High and Ridgely sts.

Veterans Dinner. 5-8 p.m. Sat; 5:30 p.m. POW/MIA Ceremony. Vets eat free. Edgewater Park Elks, 315 Green St. $10, $6 child. 609-871-3231

ARTS

Fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. 7:30 p.m. Wed. South Jersey NOW-Alice Paul Chapter presents movie preceded by a discussion of chapter activities. First Baptist Church, 19 West Main. St, Moorestown. anitafinancial@comcast.net

Photography Exhibit. Through Nov 24; 7-9 p.m. Thur, reception. Juried show of contemporary and traditional photos with varied subjects. Center for the Arts in Southern New Jersey, 123 S Elmwood Rd, Evesham. 856-985-1009. cfasnj@yahoo.com

Charcoal Drawing Classes. 10 a.m.-noon. Nov 15, 22, Dec 6, 13. For ages 14 and up with instructor, RJ Haas for beginners. Olde Town Hall, 25 Plum St, Southampton. $35. Registration, 609 859-0607. dfascenda@comcast.net

Shawnee High School presents “FAME.” 7 p.m. Thu, Fri, Sat; 1 p.m. Sat. 600 Tabernacle Rd, Medford. $12, $5 students. 609-654-7544

Greater Pinelands Dulcimer Society. 1-3:30 p.m. Nov 16. Concert and photography exhibit, fun and dance with refreshments. Bishop Farmstead, 17 Pemberton Rd, Southampton. Free. 609-859-8860. pinelandsalliance.org

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Hometown News Calendar for Week of November 9, 2014

Jewish American Heritage Month Israels attacks on Gaza …

Posted By admin on November 5, 2014

The human rights group Amnesty International said Wednesday that Israel had displayed callous indifference and in some cases committed war crimes when it bombed scores of homes of suspected militants, Click to Continue

Originally posted here: Israels attacks on Gaza homes called callous, possible war crimes

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Jewish American Heritage Month Israels attacks on Gaza …

Yehuda Glick: Peace And Loathing On Temple Mount

by Anorak | 5th, November 2014

This photo made on Nov. 10, 2013 shows a hard-line Jewish activist Yehuda Glick walking in a street in Jerusalem. Late Wednesday, a gunman on a motorcycle shot and wounded Glick outside a conference promoting Jewish access to the site known to Jews as Temple Mount and to Muslims as Noble Sanctuary. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean)

WHO is Yehuda Glick, the man shot in Israel, allegedly byMutaz Hijazi, shot dead by Israeli police?

Wikipedia tellsus:

Yehuda Joshua Glick (Hebrew: ; born 20 November 1965) is an American-born Israeli rabbi and civil rights activist who campaigns for expanding Jewish access to the Temple Mount/Haram al-Sharif. Glick is the leader of HaLiba, a coalition of groups dedicated to reaching complete and comprehensive freedom and civil rights for Jews on the Temple Mount.

Glick advocates opening the Temple Mount on an equal footing to prayer by Muslims, Jews, Christians and others.

SaidGlick:

We are talking about sharing, coexistence, tolerance, respecting one another. I think that genuine peace must begin with tolerance and respect.I think that Jews, Muslims, or Christians, anybody who supports peace, anyone who supports praying talking to G-d should be allowed to on the Temple Mount.

Christian Science Monitor writes:

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Yehuda Glick: Peace And Loathing On Temple Mount

A Tale of Two American Tragedies

As Violence Flares in Israel, Grief Comes to Our Shores

Yonatan Sindel/Flash 90

Holy Child: The grave of Chaya Zissel Braun, the infant who was killed in a terror attack.

Jerusalem In October, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict claimed two American citizens over just three days. Three-month-old Chaya Zissel Braun and 14-year-old Orwa Hammad were born in Jerusalem and Ramallah, respectively, but both held citizenship in the United States.

Chayas parents were American Jews who immigrated to Israel. Orwas parents were Palestinian Muslims who immigrated to the United States and then returned to the Israeli-occupied West Bank to raise their children. Both families migrations reflected their desire to live lives steeped in their religious heritage. They then found themselves the inheritors of the conflict.

Chaya and Orwa were killed about 19 miles away from each other, Chaya in a Jerusalem terrorist attack and Orwa in clashes with the military in the West Bank. Their deaths are singular, but they both represent the fears of Jews and Palestinians. With increasing unrest in Jerusalem since the July murder of Muhammad Abu Khdeir, allegedly by Israeli extremists, Jews say they fear a third intifada will emanate from the city, turning street corners into war zones. Palestinians say that stepped-up Israeli military activity in East Jerusalem and the West Bank, along with Israels invasion of Gaza last summer, has already left them living in war zones, and that the fear never subsides.

Through its financial and political support for Israel, and its diplomatic interventions on behalf of a two-state solution to the conflict, America has long been deeply involved in this struggle. But the deaths of Chaya and Orwa show how individual American lives are also increasingly wrapped up in the fate of Israel and the Palestinian territories as the conflict drags on and the two diasporas grow. When these lives are lost, grief spans the Atlantic.

In the last picture taken of Chaya Zissel Braun, on October 22, she is staring wide-eyed into the distance, a pink beanie tucked over her head, the camel-colored stones and green shrubs of Jerusalems Western Wall a blur in the background. It was Chayas first and only visit to Judaisms holiest site, recalled her maternal grandfather, Shimshon Halperin. He was sitting in the basement of a run-down apartment in Romema, a West Jerusalem neighborhood of colorless residential buildings interspersed with sprays of shockingly pink bougainvillea. Upstairs, Chayas parents, Shmuel Elimelech Braun, 24, and Channy Braun, 22, were receiving visitors who had come for shiva, the weeklong Jewish mourning period.

Three-month-old Chaya and her parents were on their way home from the Western Wall when an East Jerusalem Palestinian named Abelrahman al-Shaludi rammed his car into the Ammunition Hill light rail station where they were standing. City police and the U.S. Department of State have described the crash as a deliberate terrorist attack. Chaya flew 11 yards from her stroller onto the pavement and later died in the hospital. Eight others were injured. On October 26 an Ecuadorian tourist also died from her wounds. Shaludi was killed by the police.

Since his granddaughters death, Halperin, who lives in Monsey, New York, has become the public face of the tragedy. Wearing a trim black suit, and with his short side curls tucked behind his ears, he showed off the picture of Chayas trip to the Western Wall. Its a visit that he has come to see as the very crux of her short existence.

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A Tale of Two American Tragedies

Israel Limits Prayers at Mosque

Jerusalem Tensions over Jerusalems most hotly contested holy site flared Thursday after a prominent rightist campaigner for Jewish prayer there was shot in an apparent assassination attempt, and police tracked down and killed an Arab they said was the attacker.

American-born Yehuda Glick, 48, who led efforts to allow Jews to pray on the plaza known to Israelis as the Temple Mount, the site of Al-Aqsa mosque, was reported in serious but stable condition after he was shot multiple times Wednesday night as he left a gathering of activists. The shooter sped away on a motorcycle.

Early Thursday, a police counterterrorism unit shot and killed Moataz Hijazi, 32, in the mixed Jewish-Arab neighborhood of Abu Tor, which straddles the old border between east and west Jerusalem.

Hijazi worked in a restaurant in the Menachem Begin Heritage Center in west Jerusalem, where Glick had attended the meeting. Moria Halamish, who was with Glick as he left the meeting, told Israel Radio that the shooter approached him outside the center, addressed him by name and said in Arabic-accented Hebrew, Im sorry I have to do this, but you really hurt me, before opening fire.

Micky Rosenfeld, a police spokesman, said that Hijazi, a former prisoner who had served more than a decade in Israeli jails, fired on officers who had surrounded his house hours after the shooting. Relatives and neighbors accused the police of an execution-style killing, showing reporters multiple bullet holes on a rooftop where the suspects body was found.

The spike of violence raised fears of a broader eruption of unrest triggered by mounting tensions surrounding the compound in Jerusalems Old City. It is revered by Jews as the site of the first and second Jewish temples and by Muslims as their third holiest shrine, the place toward which the Prophet Muhammad prayed before God instructed him to turn toward Mecca.

There have been increased clashes at the compound between Muslim youths and police in recent weeks, triggered by alarm over increased visits by right-wing Jewish activists intent on pressing the Israeli authorities to allow Jews to pray at the site.

Under arrangements established after Israel captured the area in the 1967 Six-Day War, the Al-Aqsa mosque plaza is reserved solely for Muslim worship, though Israelis and foreigners are allowed to visit.

In response to the attack on Glick, Israeli authorities banned all entry to the compound for the first time in 14 years, triggering a sharp protest from Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, who called the Muslim and Christian sacred sites in Jerusalem a red line.

Israeli officials said later that Al-Aqsa would be opened for prayers on Friday, but men under 50 would be barred to prevent further unrest.

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Israel Limits Prayers at Mosque