Can the Klan rebrand itself?

Pointy hats, white robes, crosses burning, bodies hanging from trees.

The images of the Ku Klux Klan are reminders of the nation’s ugliest moments from the Civil War through the struggle for racial equality in the 1960s.

Last Sunday, the world was confronted with another image of the Klan: 73-year-old Frazier Glenn Cross, a white supremacist and avowed anti-Semite, in the back of a police car, spitting, “Heil Hitler!”

When his alleged rampage at two Jewish institutions in suburban Kansas City, Kansas, was over, three people were shot dead — a teenage boy and his grandfather along with a woman who worked with visually impaired children.

The carnage was devastating to many. Imperial Wizard Frank Ancona was upset, too.

“What this guy just did set back everything I’ve been trying to do for years,” said Ancona, who leads the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.

CNN tracked Ancona down on Twitter, where he has 840 followers, after he and other self-professed hate group leaders denounced the shootings in interviews with USA Today and CNN affiliate WDAF in Kansas City, Missouri.

“I believe in racial separation but it doesn’t have to be violent,” he told CNN. “People in the Klan are professional people, business people, working types. We are a legitimate organization.”

Cross, who founded the Carolina Knights of the KKK in the 1980s, went “rogue,” Ancona said.

Charged with capital murder and first-degree premeditated murder, Cross did not enter a plea at his first court appearance. He requested a court appointed attorney and is scheduled to be back in court later this month.

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Can the Klan rebrand itself?

Jewish Center Shootings, KKK Rebranding

(CNN) — Pointy hats, white robes, crosses burning, bodies hanging from trees.

The images of the Ku Klux Klan are reminders of the nation’s ugliest moments from the Civil War through the struggle for racial equality in the 1960s.

Last Sunday, the world was confronted with another image of the Klan: 73-year-old Frazier Glenn Cross, a white supremacist and avowed anti-Semite, in the back of a police car, spitting, “Heil Hitler!”

When his alleged rampage at two Jewish institutions in suburban Kansas City, Kansas, was over, three people were shot dead — a teenage boy and his grandfather along with a woman who worked with visually impaired children.

The carnage was devastating to many. Imperial Wizard Frank Ancona was upset, too.

“What this guy just did set back everything I’ve been trying to do for years,” said Ancona, who leads the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.

CNN tracked Ancona down on Twitter, where he has 840 followers, after he and other self-professed hate group leaders denounced the shootings in interviews with USA Today and CNN affiliate WDAF in Kansas City, Missouri.

“I believe in racial separation but it doesn’t have to be violent,” he told CNN. “People in the Klan are professional people, business people, working types. We are a legitimate organization.”

Cross, who founded the Carolina Knights of the KKK in the 1980s, went “rogue,” Ancona said.

Charged with capital murder and first-degree premeditated murder, Cross did not enter a plea at his first court appearance. He requested a court appointed attorney and is scheduled to be back in court later this month.

The rest is here:
Jewish Center Shootings, KKK Rebranding

After shooting, KKK leader insists they arent violent

Pointy hats, white robes, crosses burning, bodies hanging from trees.

The images of the Ku Klux Klan are reminders of the nations ugliest moments from the Civil War through the struggle for racial equality in the 1960s.

Last Sunday, the world was confronted with another image of the Klan: 73-year-old Frazier Glenn Cross, a white supremacist and avowed anti-Semite, in the back of a police car, spitting, Heil Hitler!

When his alleged rampage at two Jewish institutions in suburban Kansas City, Kansas, was over, three people were shot dead a teenage boy and his grandfather along with a woman who worked with visually impaired children.

The carnage was devastating to many. Imperial Wizard Frank Ancona was upset, too.

What this guy just did set back everything Ive been trying to do for years, said Ancona, who leads the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.

CNN tracked Ancona down on Twitter, where he has 840 followers, after he and other self-professed hate group leaders denounced the shootings in interviews with USA Today and CNN affiliate WDAF in Kansas City, Missouri.

I believe in racial separation but it doesnt have to be violent, he told CNN. People in the Klan are professional people, business people, working types. We are a legitimate organization.

Cross, who founded the Carolina Knights of the KKK in the 1980s, went rogue, Ancona said.

Charged with capital murder and first-degree premeditated murder, Cross did not enter a plea at his first court appearance. He requested a court appointed attorney and is scheduled to be back in court later this month.

Read more:
After shooting, KKK leader insists they arent violent

Can KKK change their image?

Pointy hats, white robes, crosses burning, bodies hanging from trees.

The images of the Ku Klux Klan are reminders of the nation’s ugliest moments from the Civil War through the struggle for racial equality in the 1960s.

Last Sunday, the world was confronted with another image of the Klan: 73-year-old Frazier Glenn Cross, a white supremacist and avowed anti-Semite, in the back of a police car, spitting, “Heil Hitler!”

When his alleged rampage at two Jewish institutions in suburban Kansas City, Kansas, was over, three people were shot dead — a teenage boy and his grandfather along with a woman who worked with visually impaired children.

The carnage was devastating to many. Imperial Wizard Frank Ancona was upset, too.

“What this guy just did set back everything I’ve been trying to do for years,” said Ancona, who leads the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.

CNN tracked Ancona down on Twitter, where he has 840 followers, after he and other self-professed hate group leaders denounced the shootings in interviews.

“I believe in racial separation but it doesn’t have to be violent,” he told CNN. “People in the Klan are professional people, business people, working types. We are a legitimate organization.”

Cross, who founded the Carolina Knights of the KKK in the 1980s, went “rogue,” Ancona said.

Charged with capital murder and first-degree premeditated murder, Cross did not enter a plea at his first court appearance. He requested a court appointed attorney and is scheduled to be back in court later this month.

Continued here:
Can KKK change their image?

A new way for the KKK?

Roots of the Ku Klux Klan

Roots of the Ku Klux Klan

Roots of the Ku Klux Klan

Roots of the Ku Klux Klan

Roots of the Ku Klux Klan

Roots of the Ku Klux Klan

Roots of the Ku Klux Klan

Roots of the Ku Klux Klan

Roots of the Ku Klux Klan

Roots of the Ku Klux Klan

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A new way for the KKK?

Why We Fight About Pop Music

Kayne West performing in New York City, 2012

Last month, Let’s Talk About Love was reissued with a set of new essays by writers like Nick Hornby, Krist Novaselic, James Franco and NPR Music’s own Ann Powers. The timing couldn’t have been better. In 2014, nothing starts a fight more quickly than a huge pop song. Ann and Carl exchanged notes on why.

Part One: Is There A Crisis In Music Criticism?

Part Two: Why Do People Have Beef With Poptimism? Because It’s Winning

Part Three: Five Rules For New Pop Criticism

Part Four: Don’t Front

Part Five: Music We All Love Has Done Way More Harm Than Miley Ever Will

PART ONE: Is There A Crisis In Music Criticism?

Hello Carl!

First off, congrats on the new edition of Let’s Talk About Love, now subtitled “Why Other People Have Such Bad Taste.” I’m proud to be a part of that volume! But I have to ask you: Have you been working a particularly effective marketing campaign for the book? Every week lately a new argument erupts about musical taste and listening practices exactly what you examine so artfully in your book.

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Why We Fight About Pop Music

The Many Stories of Passover

If I already know the story whats the point of telling it all over again?

By Rabbi Natan Margalit

One of the simple but important sentences that we read on the Seder night is: Even if all of us were wise, discerning, venerated, and completely knowledgeable in the Torah, it is still a mitzvah for us to tell the story of the deliverance from Egypt.

This sentence presumes a very simple question: If I already know the story whats the point of telling it all over again? The answer is that this is not the kind of knowledge that one gets all at once and then you have it. It is a different kind of knowledge that is capable of growing as we re-tell it and go deeper into it.

This reminds me of a passage from a beautiful book by Mary Katherine Bateson, called Peripheral Visions: Learning along the Way. She writes,

Rabbi Natan Margalit

Planning for the classroom, we sometimes present learning in linear sequences, which may be what makes classroom learning onerous: this concept must precede that, must be fully grasped before the next is presented. Learning outside the classroom is not like that. Lessons too complex to grasp in a single occurrence spiral past again and again, small examples gradually revealing greater and greater implications.

Telling the Passover story at the seder is more like this kind of learning than classroom learning: it spirals past every year and we are meant to get new insights as we re-tell it in different circumstances, at different ages. When I was a single grad student studying Talmud I would have seders with my friends in which wed stay up almost all night discussing the deeper meanings of the story. Now, with a couple of small kids, we usually get up from the table, put on costumes and act out the story in a fun and attention-grabbing way.

In this way the Passover story is a lot like the myths that many traditional cultures tell: they are often deceptively simple stories, but there are layers of meaning hidden, waiting to be revealed. Notice that I am using the term myth not in the way that we sometimes use it in everyday speech, as something that isnt true: Its only a myth that someone buried a Red Sox uniform under the new Yankee Stadium. Im using myth in the old sense of the stories that cultures tell to try to convey and teach their deepest wisdom. These stories are the heritage of the whole culture, from children to the oldest and wisest, so they need to be both simple and deep at the same time.

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The Many Stories of Passover

Neighbors: Local news from the York County community for the week of April 7, 2014

The York Daily Record/Sunday News shares information on upcoming community events as well as short news items of local interest in its “Neighbors” notes. These items are updated online each Monday and appear in various places throughout each day’s print edition.

Roundup of news and events in southern York County for April 8 to 14, 2014

Suburban Life: Open-air community farmers’ markets bring produce to the people

York College names fall semester dean’s list students

Volunteers needed for outdoor spring-cleaning efforts around York County

Media center: See photos readers have shared this month

High school art showcase: YorkArts@CityArt, 118 W. Philadelphia St., is proud to showcase the artwork of nine York County high schools through May 31. Each high school will be installing the exhibits themselves, as well as organizing the opening receptions, functioning as a learning experience for art students of York County. These one-week exhibitions will feature artwork by:

York Country Day School, on display now through April 12. Exhibit reception will be 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. April 7. Contact Stephen March at smarch@ycds.org.

Kennard-Dale High School, on display from April 13 to 19. Exhibit reception will be 6 to 8 p.m. April 18. Contact Erin Bastian at bastiane@sesd.k12.pa.us.

Northeastern High School, on display from April 20 to 26. Exhibit reception will be 5 to 7 p.m. April 22. Contact Tina Gainer at gainert@nesd.k12.pa.us.

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Neighbors: Local news from the York County community for the week of April 7, 2014

ZunZuneo: The new sound of US-Cuban discord

9 hours ago by Aldo Gamboa Cubans use their cell phones in Havana on May 8, 2008

ZunZuneo, a Twitter-style application designed to get Cubans talking among themselves on their cell phones, has become the latest obstacle to improved relations between Washington and Havana.

Experts in the United States say the failed project, active between 2009 and 2012, should raise serious questions about US policies towards the communist-run Caribbean island.

The US Agency for International Development has (USAID) admitted to building the application so that Cubans, who face strict curbs on expression, could “talk freely among themselves.”

White House spokesman Jay Carney described the program as a “development assistance” scheme.

The program was debated in Congress and conducted within US law, said Carney.

He bristled at suggestions that USAID was being used to mount a covert operation aimed at inciting political unrest against Cuba’s communist leaders.

Discretion on implementing the program “does not make it covert,” Carney said. “USAID is a development agency, not an intelligence agency. Suggestions that this was a covert program are wrong.”

‘Dumb, dumb, dumb’

But some experts feel differently.

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ZunZuneo: The new sound of US-Cuban discord

Putin: Military Invasion in Ukraine Last Resort

MOSCOW, March 4 (RIA Novosti) Russian President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday called the acting authorities in Ukraine illegitimate, but said a military intervention in Russias western neighbor would be a last resort.

The remarks were the first public comments from Putin on the crisis in Ukraine since protesters in the capital, Kiev, swept to power last month.

Putin said Ukraines new government had no legal authority, and he urged new elections as soon as possible.

The parliament is partially legitimate, but all the rest is not. The acting president does not have any legitimacy, Putin told reporters.

While he denounced the Kiev authorities, Putin said Russia was not planning any imminent military action. The use of troops is a last resort, he said. There is no necessity to do it at the moment, though that option is on the table.

Any intervention would be purely humanitarian in nature, Putin said.

If we take a decision to deploy troops then it will only be for the peoples protection, he said. Our militaries are brothers in arms, friends. I am sure that Ukrainian and Russian soldiers will be on the same side of the barricade.

Troops under apparent Russian command, many of them traveling in military trucks and armored personnel carriers, have deployed widely around Crimea, as attested by numerous eyewitness accounts from reporters on the ground.

The troops have seized key strategic points across the peninsula, provoking a tense standoff with the Ukrainian military. Officials in Kiev and other capitals across the world have described the actions as an invasion.

Russias upper house of parliament, the Federation Council, approved on Saturday a request by Putin for the deployment of troops inside Ukraine.

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Putin: Military Invasion in Ukraine Last Resort

Putin Slams Ukrainian Govt, Says Invasion 'Last Resort'

MOSCOW, March 4 (RIA Novosti) Russian President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday called the acting authorities in Ukraine illegitimate, but said a military intervention in Russias western neighbor would be a last resort.

The remarks were the first public comments from Putin on the crisis in Ukraine since protesters in the capital, Kiev, swept to power last month.

Putin said Ukraines new government had no legal authority, and he urged new elections as soon as possible.

The parliament is partially legitimate, but all the rest is not. The acting president does not have any legitimacy, Putin told reporters.

While he denounced the Kiev authorities, Putin said Russia was not planning any imminent military action. The use of troops is a last resort, he said. There is no necessity to do it at the moment, though that option is on the table.

Any intervention would be purely humanitarian in nature, Putin said.

If we take a decision to deploy troops then it will only be for the peoples protection, he said. Our militaries are brothers in arms, friends. I am sure that Ukrainian and Russian soldiers will be on the same side of the barricade.

Troops under apparent Russian command, many of them traveling in military trucks and armored personnel carriers, have deployed widely around Crimea, as attested by numerous eyewitness accounts from reporters on the ground.

The troops have seized key strategic points across the peninsula, provoking a tense standoff with the Ukrainian military. Officials in Kiev and other capitals across the world have described the actions as an invasion.

Russias upper house of parliament, the Federation Council, approved on Saturday a request by Putin for the deployment of troops inside Ukraine.

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Putin Slams Ukrainian Govt, Says Invasion 'Last Resort'

AP News in Brief at 8:58 p.m. EDT

Australia pours resources into search area for clues to wreckage of missing plane

PERTH, Australia (AP) – Australia’s prime minister said Sunday that he was hopeful a clue will emerge soon to narrow the hunt for Flight 370, as more objects were pulled from the southern Indian Ocean and checked to see whether they were part of the plane that went missing more than three weeks ago.

So far, even though more ships are scouring the area off western Australia, none of the recovered items has been connected to the Malaysia Airlines plane that crashed March 8 with 239 people on board.

“My understanding from this morning is that there has been no discrete debris associated with the flight,” Australian Navy Commodore Peter Leavy told reporters Sunday.

In Sydney, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott described the “intensifying search effort” as positive because objects “have been recovered from the ocean.”

The Australian Maritimes Safety Authority said 10 planes took part in the search Sunday, leaving in staggered times from the western city of Perth. Eight ships were on the scene, including the Australian navy supply ship HMAS Success, which is to store any wreckage found.

Chinese relatives demand Malaysia apologize over handling of search for missing jetliner

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) – Several dozen Chinese relatives of passengers on Flight 370 demanded Sunday that Malaysia apologize for its handling of the search for the missing plane and for the prime minister’s statement saying it crashed into the southern Indian Ocean.

Holding up banners that read “We want evidence, truth, dignity” in Chinese, and “Hand us the murderer. Tell us the truth. Give us our relatives back” in English, the group staged a protest at a hotel near Kuala Lumpur just hours after flying in from Beijing.

Two-thirds of the 227 passengers aboard the Malaysia Airlines plane that disappeared March 8 en route to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur were Chinese, and the plane’s disappearance has sparked broad outrage in China, with celebrities joining in and travel agencies announcing boycotts.

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AP News in Brief at 8:58 p.m. EDT

Budgeting for a New Year

Making the Most of Your Family Income

Give children an allowance and guide them through the process of saving and spending.

There are many reasons families may need to re-evaluate their budgets, from life changes to illness to other hardships. We talked to three local moms, all of whom learned how to re-evaluate their monetary priorities and accommodate lifes big surprises.

Laney and her husband have two children. Their family finances took a hit when her husband unexpectedly lost his job in November 2012. (Laney did not want her last name used for this article.)

Callie Cromers husband Clay recently left the Coast Guard to pursue a career in Christian ministries. He is currently attending graduate school. They have two children: James, 3, and Caleb, 2.

April Sampson was recently diagnosed with breast cancer. She had a double mastectomy and is receiving chemotherapy treatments. She and her husband have two children: Summer, 14, and Lela, 9.

No one gets the budgeting process right the first time and that expectation causes people to give up, he says. Begin small by tracking your monthly income and expenses and grow from there.

Going from a two-person income to a single one can be especially difficult.

Laney knows this all too well: In November 2012, her husband unexpectedly lost his job.

Needless to say, we were pretty scared, she says. His salary was our main income providing everything from the house to health care.

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Budgeting for a New Year

Heritage & Cultural Events

Behind The Scenes: DNA New Works Series Feb. 20 Evening Edition 1 Comment

Developing new works is in the La Jolla Playhouses blood. Perhaps thats why its DNA New Works Series is so appropriately named. Last year’s inaugural series was a success and now begins the second season of this innovative play development program.

Black History Month 2014 Honorees

The Montford Point Marines are a little known part of U.S. military history. Born out of necessity, when African American men were first drafted to serve in World War II, the legacy of the Marines who trained at Montford Point in North Carolina is a mirror of the times, back when segregation and discrimination were par for the course.

Black History Month 2014 Honorees

True heroism. You can see it in their hands, brown and weathered. Their long fingers, slightly bent from the weight of the load they’ve had to carry. It’s in their faces too, which exemplify a quiet dignity, and in their eyes, which glisten like gems from beneath the Pacific. An homage perhaps, to their time in Hawaii, Saipan, Guam and Okinawa. The crevices that line their faces and their somber, knowing smiles reveal a measure of the life they’ve lived.

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Heritage & Cultural Events

Franklin's hiring a benchmark for Penn State

UNIVERSITY PARK Late on a Monday afternoon in May 1968, half of Penn State University’s black student population marched from College Avenue and up the campus mall to Old Main. Numbering about 100, most were members of an activist group called the Frederick E. Douglass Association. They planned to present 12 demands to Charles Lewis, Penn State’s vice president for student affairs.

The previous month, a sniper had shot and killed Martin Luther King Jr. on a Tennessee hotel balcony. Protests were erupting on campuses throughout the country.

That was a time for expressing pain and just a time to express your deepest feelings and general vulnerability about the whole country and state and city, says Frederick Phillips, a 1968 graduate who founded the Douglass Association.

The students were dissatisfied with the treatment of the black community at Penn State. They wanted course offerings with black literature and an African culture study program. They wanted more black students, more black athletes and more black professors, and they wanted black coaches.

Less than 1 percent of the student body was black, and the school had a handful of black faculty. As for black coaches, Penn State didn’t have any.

Today, James Franklin, hired in January, is Penn State’s first black head football coach. Mr. Franklin isn’t necessarily more than a football coach, but this story is about more than football.

Penn State today is trying to be a diverse university and is as diverse as it has ever been concerning race, ethnicity and religion in an area defined by homogeneity (a 90 percent white population in Centre County). Though its black student population, 4.1 percent at University Park, is lower than the University of Pittsburgh (5.3 percent) and Temple (14.7 percent), the graduation rate for black students has improved from around 40 percent 30 years ago to 67 percent now. Its percentage of minority and black faculty is in the middle of the pack nationally for a state university.

Into these contradictions, the hiring of Mr. Franklin is another benchmark of progress. Penn State is the flagship institution for the commonwealth, and the football coach is the school’s most visible leader.

Football here has the power to unite. It has the power to make people riot. It has the power to make people donate, cry and rejoice. As Penn State’s vice provost for educational equity Terrell Jones says, Penn State football games are church.

Mr. Jones says the highest-growing number of minority students he sees at Penn State are those of mixed race. Mr. Franklin’s late mother was white, from Britain, and his late father was black. He was a first-generation college student and he needed financial aid from football and a Pell Grant to attend East Stroudsburg University.

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Franklin's hiring a benchmark for Penn State

Around Your Town for March 22, 2014

Provided photo Twelve Pueblo Del Sol Elementary School students received certificates March 13 for completion of the Kiwanis Club of Sierra Vista sponsored Water Safety Course at the Sierra Vista Aquatic Center. The two-week class covered basic water confidence, safety and survival skills for the beginning swimmer. The club president Laura Miller Bradley presented the certificates to (L to R): Sadie Johnson, Ry Lee Fisher, Seth Conder, Leah Reeves, Emily Collins, Adon Rutherford, Anaabella Torres, Sebastian Dyke, Connor Hawthorne, Karsten Rutherford and Addison Lucia. Not pictured is Gernei May.

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The Kiwanis Club of Sierra Vista Community Service Foundation will host its annual Bunko Night from 6-9 p.m. March 22 at the Windemere Hotel. Admission is $25 per person. Activities include raffles, silent auction and many prizes. Cocktails will be served starting at 6 p.m. with Bunko lessons available. Appetizers will be served from 6-7 p.m. and Bunko game played from 7-9 p.m. Tickets are available at the Windemere Hotel or call Laura at 459-2310 or Marge at 508-3414. You must be 21 years of age to attend. Proceeds from the fundraiser go to benefit the youth ofourcommunity.

March is Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month. The Friends of the San Pedro River will lead walks to significant historic sites within the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area every Saturday in March. All tours will start at 9 a.m. On March 22 Historian Richard Bauer will lead a rare walk to the southern part of the Fairbank Historic Townsite to view the remains of the Southern Pacific depot, several railroad bridges, the water pump and tower and other remnants of the railroading era of Fairbank. Meet at the Fairbank Schoolhouse. Wear a hat and good walking shoes; bring sunscreen, water, and a snack. Allow at least 3 hours for each walk. For more info: www.sanpedroriver.org. For statewideevents:www.azstateparks.com/archy/.

On Saturday, March 22, at 9:30 a.m., the Cochise Music Teachers Association will feature Doreen Oberg presenting a program on piano pedagogy. All music teachers in the area are invited to the upcoming meeting, to be held at Francies Studio, 831 Plaza Encanto, in Sierra Vista, with refreshments and social time beginning at 9 a.m. Francie Schofield will perform piano selections beginning at 9:15 a.m. She will also give a presentation on the composer Friedrich Kuhlau. A short business meeting will follow the program. Please plan to attend to learn of opportunities for our students, as well as ourselves. The CMTA is the southeast Arizona district of the Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) and a local association of the Arizona State Music Teachers Association. Membership in the national association automatically includes membership in the state and local associations. For more information, contact Doreen Oberg, Vice-president, at 678-6356 or Debbie Dinkel, president,at458-5704.

March is Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month. The Friends of the San Pedro River will lead walks to significant historic sites within the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area every Saturday in March. All tours will start at 9 a.m. For more info: www.sanpedroriver.org. For statewideevents:www.azstateparks.com/archy/.

Huachuca City Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10342 has Bingo each Saturday. Early Bird Games begin at 6:15 p.m. and Regular Bingo 7 p.m. at 1301 Cochise Street, Huachuca City. Bingo is open to the public. For more information,call456-2501.

The Vietnam Helicopter Pilots Association Arizona Chapter will hold a membership meeting on Saturday, March 22, at 10 a.m. in the conference room at the Sierra Vista Public Library. All current and past members of the VHPA, or anyone who flew helicopters during the Vietnam War, all service branches, are encouraged to attend. For more information, call Bob Simon at(541)840-7035.

The Cochise Mustang Club is having an all-Mustang Roundup Car Show on Saturday, March 22, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Lawley Ford car dealership. Anyone with a Ford Mustang, new or old, rusty or shiny, whatever you have is welcome to enter the roundup. Free entry, free admission, free music and fun. Can you Mustang come out and play? For more informationemailcochisemustang@gmail.com.

The Gold Wing Riders Association Chapter E of Sierra Vista, will hosts its 22nd annual motorist awareness event on March 22 in The Mall at Sierra Vista. There will bikes and trikes on display and members will be on hand to answer questions. For more information, contact Bobbie Wagner,(520)732-0769.

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Around Your Town for March 22, 2014