Lorain synagogue epxresses solidarity after vandalism – Chronicle … – Chronicle Telegram

LORAIN Several hundred people attended Saturday services at Agudath BNai Israel Synagogue to stand in solidarity with the congregation after the synagogue was recently vandalized with a swastika and anti-Semitic message.

A day care worker at Agudath Bnai Israel Synagogue, 1715 Meister Road, arrived at work last week and saw a swastika carved into a metal door frame followed by an anti-Semitic statement, We will rise and gas you (expletive), according to a police report.

Many local public officials including the mayor, several city council members, current and former Lorain County commissioners and several Lorain County Court of Common Pleas judges attended.

Zachary Simonoff, a member of the synagogue who also serves on the synagogues board, spoke during a phone interview after the service in a personal capacity and not on behalf of the synagogue.

Simonoff said such an act of vandalism will not scare those like him who attend services at the synagogue. Synagogue officials met with the Anti-Defamation League last Sunday, security has been increased and Lorain police contacted the FBI and continues to investigate the vandalism.

The vandalism at the Lorain synagogue occurred among a backdrop of 122 bomb threats called in to Jewish organizations in three dozen states since Jan. 9 and a rash of vandalism at Jewish cemeteries, as reported by the Associated Press.

Simonoff said Jews have been considered outsiders and persecuted for centuries, and recent acts of anti-Semitism are troubling. However, he said the turnout Saturday reaffirms his belief that although the roots of anti-Semitism run deep, they dont spread far.

The vast majority of people in Lorain and Lorain County are not anti-Semitic, and I think this is really a sign of ignorance, he said.

When hatred appears, the best thing to do is to speak out against it, Simonoff said. People also should educate themselves on different religions and learn about Jewish persecution and the Holocaust as World War II gets further and further from public consciousness, he said.

I personally believe that the moment any anti-Semitism or racism rears its head, youve got to kick it in the teeth as soon as possible so as not to give it a chance to grow, Simonoff said. Were not going anywhere. We are going to continue to practice Judaism as we have in Lorain for more than 100 years.

Lorain police Capt. Roger Watkins attended the service along with other members of the police department including Chief Cel Rivera. Watkins grew up in Lorain and said his father worked at the synagogue as a janitor after retirement and his mother helps out in the kitchen there.

I was really glad to see so many people come out in a show of support to that temple, he said.

Lorain County Commissioner Matt Lundy said the vandalism wasnt the focus of the discussion following the service. Those present were more focused on discussing how to move forward since this has not happened before, he said.

I think its important that we stand together as a community during times like this, Lundy said. I think we need to send a clear message that we as a community reject hate. What happened is not a reflection of the countys values, and many people are disturbed, disappointed and quite saddened that something like this could happen.

Lorain Mayor Chase Ritenauer echoed those sentiments and said Lorain is united and will not tolerate such hatred.

The freedom to worship is a basic American ideal and we all need to protect it when it is attacked, he said. We really are the International City and we have open arms to multiple races, different nationalities and different religions. We are a community whose strength is built upon the fabric of diversity in many different ways. Todays crowd was just another example of that.

Contact Jon Wysochanski at 329-7123 or jwysochanski@chroniclet.com.

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Lorain synagogue epxresses solidarity after vandalism – Chronicle … – Chronicle Telegram

Synagogue Defaced With Graffiti Proclaiming the Holocaust ‘Fake History’ – Mediaite

Today, a local report out of Seattle indicates that there was a vandalism attack on a synagogue in the citys Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Seattles crime blotter said this:

Around 5 AM Friday morning, an SPD officer working off-duty in the area spotted a spray painted message, describing the Holocaust as fake history, on an exterior wall of the temple in the 1400 block of 16th Avenue.

Fake history is likely a play on fake news by Holocaust deniers. The term fake news rose to prominence after the 2016 presidential election when it was revealed that some writers had been profiting off of falsities posted on sites that looked like legitimate news sources. The term was then co-opted by people who wanted to disparage the media at large for reporting things they didnt like.

This is the latest in a string of anti-Semitic vandalism and behavior in recent months. Swastikas popped up in press pens along the campaign trail during the election, Jewish cemeteries have been defaced, and a family in Arizona had their decorative menorah bent into a swastika shape on their front lawn, to name only a few.

[image: Shutterstock]

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Synagogue Defaced With Graffiti Proclaiming the Holocaust ‘Fake History’ – Mediaite

Vandalized Capitol Hill synagogue calls for pushback against toxic expression – The Seattle Times

The Seattle synagogue Temple De Hirsch Sinai was vandalized with graffiti saying The Holocaust is fake history. Its rabbi responded: Were not going to allow those who terrorize us to define us.

A synagogue in the Capitol Hill neighborhood was vandalized overnight Thursday with anti-Semitic, Holocaust-denying graffiti, said Rabbi Daniel Weiner of Temple De Hirsch Sinai.

A Seattle police officer discovered the spray-painted message Friday morning on the old sanctuarys facade.

It says, The Holocaust is fake history, Weiner said. The s characters in the graffiti are dollar signs, Weiner said.

It really is a toxic mix of Holocaust denial, the stereotypical charge that Jews are obsessed with money, and the notion coming from the (President Trump) administration that all facts are fungible fake facts, fake history, Weiner said.

Police also investigated a box deemed suspicious because it was found outside a door at the synagogue where deliveries are not made, said Seattle Police Chief Kathleen OToole, who went to the scene. The box contained books that someone had donated to the synagogue, police said.

Shortly after the discovery of the graffiti, a neighbor hung a bedsheet saying Love Wins over the markings, Weiner said.

It was a very sweet gesture and touching, but we took it down I think its extremely important that people see this.

Weiner said the Seattle police are investigating the incident as a hate crime. He said hed been hearing all morning from people who worship at the temple.

People are incredibly hurt and upset. But most of the calls Ive gotten, all of the calls have been supportive, but most have been defiant, he said.

We are going to do our due diligence in terms of security, Weiner said. At the same time, were not going to allow those who terrorize us to define us.

Federal officials have been investigating more than 120 threats since Jan. 9 against Jewish organizations in three dozen states and a rash of vandalism at Jewish cemeteries.

On Feb. 27, a bomb threat forced evacuation of the Stroum Jewish Community Center on Mercer Island.

Seattle Police Department spokesman Patrick Michaud said officers will be patrolling the area around the temple when they have extra time between 911 calls.

Michaud said police did not have a suspect.

Bias incidents have been rising in Seattle since at least 2012, according to Seattle Police Department statistics. Last year, 255 such incidents were reported to police.

Top police officials had met with temple leaders as recently as Wednesday to discuss concerns over hate crimes.

With all thats happening nationally we want people in all of our communities to feel safe, OToole said. Weve been meeting with people of this temple. Weve been meeting with people in mosques around the city we take these cases very seriously.

Weiner said he has been at Temple De Hirsch Sinai for 16 years. He said the synagogue has experienced minor vandalism before and received a threatening phone call after the election.

But, in my time, theres been nothing like this, Weiner said.

Since the election, Weiner said he believes people who were previously marginalized or silenced now feel newly empowered to express hateful sentiments.

The majority of us need to push back against that and convey that America is still America theres no place for hate or tolerance of toxic expression.

Other communities are also being threatened, Weiner said. This is a considerable and conspicuous upsurge in attacks on all vulnerable minority populations, he said.

Weiner said he and other faith leaders had already been scheduled to meet with U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell on Friday afternoon to discuss the rise in hate crimes and possible solutions.

Its a little more imminent and urgent than I had hoped it would be, he said.

Weiner never made it to the meeting. It was announced that he was on his way, but he got news of the suspicious package and had to turn back.

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Vandalized Capitol Hill synagogue calls for pushback against toxic expression – The Seattle Times

Not just prayers: synagogues are organizing to fight Trump’s agenda – Cleveland Jewish News

NEW YORK The day after the presidential election, as congregants gathered in her Brooklyn synagogue to air their feelings, Rabbi Rachel Timoner was already starting to organize against the incoming administration.

She called her local city councilman, Democrat Brad Lander, and together they organized an activists panel at her congregation, Beth Elohim, to discuss policy changes under President Donald Trump. More than 1,000 people packed the sanctuary for the event.

Four months later, Beth Elohim has been transformed into an activist hub in Brooklyns affluent and historically progressive Park Slope neighborhood. Together with Lander, the synagogue has set up 15 working groups on liberal causes ranging from combating anti-Semitism and Islamophobia to protecting reproductive rights. Ten thousand people are active in the groups, and seven mass meetings of the activists, educating them on issues and teaching organizing tactics, have drawn an average crowd of 1,000.

Our people are awakened, activated, determined, in some cases alarmed, and deeply wanting to be part of preventing harm and healing this country, Timoner said. I have literally hundreds of members who are in acute pain, who are seeing their country become distorted.

Beth Elohim is among several synagogues that have doubled down on political activism since Trumps election. Synagogues are taking on roles usually reserved for nonprofits hiring professional activists, organizing protests, mobilizing congregants to lobby and educating them on immigrant and refugee rights. Several synagogues sent delegations to the Womens March on Washington and its local offshoots in January.

Some of these synagogues dont see the work as partisan, aimed as they are directly at Trumps policies. (Trump himself has called for loosening federal laws that prevent houses of worship from endorsing political candidates.) Others, citing overwhelming demand among their congregants, are less concerned about appearing political. But they all say that regardless of the risks, this is the moment for synagogues to offer their members a chance to engage on issues that matter to them in a Jewish context.

We have Torah, and Torah is very clear that we do not oppress the stranger, that we love our fellow human beings as we love ourselves, Timoner said. What I think it offers to have things like this happen in a synagogue is it provides the moral framework.

Beth Elohim has received a grant to hire a community organizer, a step Manhattans Stephen Wise Free Synagogue is also taking, fueled by more than $100,000 in congregant donations. Stephen Wise is organizing its members into three activist groups on refugees and immigrants; anti-Semitism and Islamophobia; and protecting civil liberties.

Stephen Wise helped raise $20,000 for Jews in Whitefish, Montana, when they were threatened by white supremacists in January. In June, a delegation from the synagogue will travel to Greece and Germany to aid refugees, while educating kids at the synagogue about refugee rights. Ammiel Hirsch, the synagogues rabbi, expects groups to lobby legislators on a range of issues as well.

Judaism is a faith that believes in action, in making the world a better place through policy, Hirsch said. Theres got to be a force of legislation behind it. Otherwise, its just a question of localized humanitarian action, without regard to collective policies that ensure were on a higher moral plane.

Other synagogues have collaborated in interfaith initiatives or served as spaces for activist gatherings. Bnai Jeshurun in Manhattan was the site of a rally that drew thousands before the New York City womens march in January. The synagogue has also set up an action alert list with 200 subscribers to mobilize congregants for protests.

Bnai Jeshurun congregants at the HIAS rally for refugees in February. (Courtesy of Bnai Jeshurun)

For some of these synagogues, the current activism is just an intensification of a historical tilt toward political engagement. Bnai Jeshurun has a longstanding program to aid New York State farmworkers, while Temple Sinai in Washington, D.C., led two trips to aid undocumented immigrants in Texas in 2014 and 2016, before Trumps election.Synagogues nationwide have long been active on Israel policy, and in the 1970s and 1980s, on behalf ofSoviet Jewry.

But some congregants see synagogue-based political action as a step too far. David Horowich, a Reform Jewish businessman from Syracuse who voted for Trump, appreciates Reform Judaisms cultural and communal aspects. But he feels synagogues shouldnt be in the business of political advocacy, because its not always easy to judge whether policies are successful.

I havent been in favor of coming out with statements that are political, because sometimes they can come back and haunt you, Horowich said. Im open to people expressing their opinions, but you have to wait until it all plays out.

For those who oppose him, Trumps policies on refugees and immigration have become a particular focus of synagogue activism. All four religious denominations and several major organizations opposed the first iteration of his immigrationban in January.

In response to Trumps immigration policies, several synagogues have declared themselves sanctuaries for undocumented immigrants. For some synagogues, including Temple Sinai, that means setting aside rooms should undocumented immigrants need a place tolive. Others, like Philadelphias Congregation Beth Zion-Beth Israel, which is exploring becoming a sanctuary,are holding classes for immigrants and others on immigrant and refugee rights.

Our religious tradition teaches about not only welcoming the stranger but not oppressing the stranger, and making sure the most vulnerable in our midst has been protected and cared for, said Temple Sinai Rabbi Jonathan Roos. The level of fear is at a level unseen during the Obama years, even when the level of deportations was high.

The push for synagogue activism appears to be spreading. Timoner has held two conference calls with rabbis interested in Beth Elohims model. And Truah, the rabbinichuman rights group, drew 200 rabbis to a conference in February, called No Time for Neutrality, that ended with 19 rabbis getting arrested during a protest in front of a Trump hotel in New York City.

We have more power, privilege and social capital than weve ever had in this country, said Beth Zion-Beth Israel Rabbi Yosef Goldman.Its an opportunity for us to be vigilant about using our power to defend our own community, but [also] to defend those around us who are more vulnerable than we are.

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Not just prayers: synagogues are organizing to fight Trump’s agenda – Cleveland Jewish News

Capitol Hill Synagogue Vandalized With Alternative Facts – Seattle Weekly

Spray-painted message says The Holocaust is fake history. Its not.

Another day, another hate crime.

A Capitol Hill synagogue has been vandalized with Holocaust-denying graffiti, the Seattle Times reports. Per the Times, Temple De Hirsch Sinai was vandalized on Thursday night with a spray-painted message reading, The Holocaust is fake history, with the s characters as dollar signs (a reference to the anti-Semitic stereotype of Jewish people as being obsessed with money.)

The vandalism comes as some fear a rise in white nationalism in the area. As it happens, on Friday U.S. Rep. Pramila Jayapal, who represents Capitol Hill, introduced a resolution urging the Department of Justice to investigate a series of recent incidents as hate crimes. This includes the recent shooting of a Sikh-American in Kent, in which the shooter reportedly said Go back to your country before pulling the trigger.

In a press release, Jayapal said she was speaking about the resolution on the steps of the U.S. Capitol when she learned about the synagogue vandalism.

We will not be intimidated. Today, I introduced a House resolution calling on the Department of Justice to fully fund hate crime investigations into the rise in attacks on Jewish, Sikh, Indian, and Muslim-Americans and communities of color, Jayapal, who is an immigrant from India, said in a press release.

Speaking to the Times, Rabbi Daniel Weiner compared the graffiti message to the alternative facts coming out of the Trump administration. All facts are fungible, Weiner said of the age of Trump. Fake facts, fake history.

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Capitol Hill Synagogue Vandalized With Alternative Facts – Seattle Weekly

Not just prayers: synagogues are organizing to fight Trump’s agenda – Jewish Telegraphic Agency

Congregants of Bnai Jeshurun in New York City rally on behalf of immigrants Thursday, Mar. 9, 2017. Bnai Jeshurun is one of several synagogues more assertively embracing activism since Donald Trumps election. (Courtesy of Bnai Jeshurun)

NEW YORK (JTA) The day after the presidential election, as congregants gathered in her Brooklyn synagogue to air their feelings, Rabbi Rachel Timoner was already starting to organize against the incoming administration.

She called her local city councilman, Democrat Brad Lander, and together they organized an activists panel at her congregation, Beth Elohim, to discuss policy changes under President Donald Trump. More than 1,000 people packed the sanctuary for the event.

Four months later, Beth Elohim has been transformed into an activist hub in Brooklyns affluent and historically progressive Park Slope neighborhood. Together with Lander, the synagogue has set up 15 working groups on liberal causes ranging from combating anti-Semitism and Islamophobia to protecting reproductive rights. Ten thousand people are active in the groups, and seven mass meetings of the activists, educating them on issues and teaching organizing tactics, have drawn an average crowd of 1,000.

Our people are awakened, activated, determined, in some cases alarmed, and deeply wanting to be part of preventing harm and healing this country, Timoner said. I have literally hundreds of members who are in acute pain, who are seeing their country become distorted.

Beth Elohim is among several synagogues that have doubled down on political activism since Trumps election. Synagogues are taking on roles usually reserved for nonprofits hiring professional activists, organizing protests, mobilizing congregants to lobby and educating them on immigrant and refugee rights. Several synagogues sent delegations to the Womens March on Washington and its local offshoots in January.

Some of these synagogues dont see the work as partisan, aimed as they are directly at Trumps policies. (Trump himself has called for loosening federal laws that prevent houses of worship from endorsing political candidates.) Others, citing overwhelming demand among their congregants, are less concerned about appearing political. But they all say that regardless of the risks, this is the moment for synagogues to offer their members a chance to engage on issues that matter to them in a Jewish context.

We have Torah, and Torah is very clear that we do not oppress the stranger, that we love our fellow human beings as we love ourselves, Timoner said. What I think it offers to have things like this happen in a synagogue is it provides the moral framework.

Beth Elohim has received a grant to hire a community organizer, a step Manhattans Stephen Wise Free Synagogue is also taking, fueled by more than $100,000 in congregant donations. Stephen Wise is organizing its members into three activist groups on refugees and immigrants; anti-Semitism and Islamophobia; and protecting civil liberties.

Stephen Wise helped raise $20,000 for Jews in Whitefish, Montana, when they were threatened by white supremacists in January. In June, a delegation from the synagogue will travel to Greece and Germany to aid refugees, while educating kids at the synagogue about refugee rights. Ammiel Hirsch, the synagogues rabbi, expects groups to lobby legislators on a range of issues as well.

Judaism is a faith that believes in action, in making the world a better place through policy, Hirsch said. Theres got to be a force of legislation behind it. Otherwise, its just a question of localized humanitarian action, without regard to collective policies that ensure were on a higher moral plane.

Other synagogues have collaborated in interfaith initiatives or served as spaces for activist gatherings. Bnai Jeshurun in Manhattan was the site of a rally that drew thousands before the New York City womens march in January. The synagogue has also set up an action alert list with 200 subscribers to mobilize congregants for protests.

Bnai Jeshurun congregants at the HIAS rally for refugees in February. (Courtesy of Bnai Jeshurun)

For some of these synagogues, the current activism is just an intensification of a historical tilt toward political engagement. Bnai Jeshurun has a longstanding program to aid New York State farmworkers, while Temple Sinai in Washington, D.C., led two trips to aid undocumented immigrants in Texas in 2014 and 2016, before Trumps election.Synagogues nationwide have long been active on Israel policy, and in the 1970s and 1980s, on behalf ofSoviet Jewry.

But some congregants see synagogue-based political action as a step too far. David Horowich, a Reform Jewish businessman from Syracuse who voted for Trump, appreciates Reform Judaisms cultural and communal aspects. But he feels synagogues shouldnt be in the business of political advocacy, because its not always easy to judge whether policies are successful.

I havent been in favor of coming out with statements that are political, because sometimes they can come back and haunt you, Horowich said. Im open to people expressing their opinions, but you have to wait until it all plays out.

For those who oppose him, Trumps policies on refugees and immigration have become a particular focus of synagogue activism. All four religious denominations and several major organizations opposed the first iteration of his immigrationban in January.

In response to Trumps immigration policies, several synagogues have declared themselves sanctuaries for undocumented immigrants. For some synagogues, including Temple Sinai, that means setting aside rooms should undocumented immigrants need a place tolive. Others, like Philadelphias Congregation Beth Zion-Beth Israel, which is exploring becoming a sanctuary,are holding classes for immigrants and others on immigrant and refugee rights.

Our religious tradition teaches about not only welcoming the stranger but not oppressing the stranger, and making sure the most vulnerable in our midst has been protected and cared for, said Temple Sinai Rabbi Jonathan Roos. The level of fear is at a level unseen during the Obama years, even when the level of deportations was high.

The push for synagogue activism appears to be spreading. Timoner has held two conference calls with rabbis interested in Beth Elohims model. And Truah, the rabbinichuman rights group, drew 200 rabbis to a conference in February, called No Time for Neutrality, that ended with 19 rabbis getting arrested during a protest in front of a Trump hotel in New York City.

We have more power, privilege and social capital than weve ever had in this country, said Beth Zion-Beth Israel Rabbi Yosef Goldman.Its an opportunity for us to be vigilant about using our power to defend our own community, but [also] to defend those around us who are more vulnerable than we are.

Read more:
Not just prayers: synagogues are organizing to fight Trump’s agenda – Jewish Telegraphic Agency

Fight over control of oldest US synagogue reaches appeals court – The Boston Globe


The Boston Globe
Fight over control of oldest US synagogue reaches appeals court
The Boston Globe
BOSTON Appeals court judges deciding the fate of the nation's oldest synagogue seemed skeptical Wednesday about a lower court's decision to put control of the building and a set of bells worth millions of dollars in the hands of the congregation

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Fight over control of oldest US synagogue reaches appeals court – The Boston Globe

VIDEO: Thief Brazenly Steals Tefillin From Coats in Synagogue … – DNAinfo

The man rode up to the Midwood synagogue on his bike and started picking through coats hanging inside, police said. View Full Caption

NYPD

BROOKLYN A thief brazenly pilfered the pockets of coats hanging on racks inside a Midwood synagogue, stealing an iPod and fivetefillin as people passed him by on Friday afternoon, NYPD officials said.

The pickpocket, who can be seen in police video, rode up on a bicycle to the Congregation Verezky Synagogue at 814 Ave. L, near East Eighth Street, about 12:30 p.m. and started searching through the coats, police said.

Video shows the man reaching into pockets as people walk past him, apparently unaware that he was stealing.

He made off with three cellphones and an iPod, police said.

The thief also stole five tefillin, the black leather boxes with leather straps that Jewish men wear during prayer, an NYPD spokesman said.

The suspect, who is about 5 feet 7 inches, fled on his bike and hadn’t been arrested as of Thursday morning, police said.

Anyone with information should contact Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477).

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VIDEO: Thief Brazenly Steals Tefillin From Coats in Synagogue … – DNAinfo

Fight over control of Newport’s historic Touro Synagogue goes to next level – The Providence Journal

Lawyers for New York and Newport congregations argued before a 3-judge panel of the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in Boston, over a District Court decision awarding the nation’s oldest synagogue to Newport-based Jeshuat Israel.

BOSTON — The two Jewish congregations vying for control of Touro Synagogue in Newport sparred with vigor Wednesday before the federal appeals court.

Louis Solomon, lawyer for New York City’s Congregation Shearith Israel, argued to the three-judge 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel that U.S. District Court Judge John J. McConnell Jr. was wrong toaward authority over the nation’s oldest synagogue to Newport-based Congregation Jeshuat Israel. McConnell’s ruling cleared the way for the Newport group to sell ornate bells, it said, to protect the synagogue’s financial future.

Solomon asserted that Shearith Israel held a 1903 lease to the synagogue and as such was the rightful owner of the building as well as the bells, valued $7-plus million. He cast the lease as a “valid and vital” agreement. Solomon insisted, too, that the congregation wasn’t seeking to evict Newport Jews from the synagogue, but the Jeshuat Israel congregation itself.

“So long as the cathedral was there, the finials [bells] would be part of it,” Solomon said. Shearith Israel has objected to the sale of the silverfinial bells, or Rimonim, saying it runs counter to the traditionsof the Orthodox Spanish and Portuguese, or Sephardic, Jews who founded the synagogue.

“That is what we want enforced,” Solomon said. He charged that McConnell had no right to remove Shearith Israel as the Touro’s trustees.

But Gary Naftalis argued for Jeshuat Israel that the bells were not part of the leasethe two congregations entered into in 1903. Naftalis told the court that the Newport congregation has served as the keepers of the storied synagogue and its relics since the 1700s.

Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Souter, who sat on the panel Wednesday, asked Naftalis why that 1903 agreement and others reached and documents over the past century don’t supersede the synagogue’s more dated, historic records. Judges Sandra Lynch and Bobby R. Baldock joined him in that line of inquiry.

And why had Jeshuat Israel paid Shearith Israel a lease for all those years?Souter asked.

“The lease covers the synagogue,” Naftalis said. “It doesn’t cover theRimonim, period.” If the lease had intended to convey ownership of the bells to Shearith Israel through the 1903 agreement, it would have stated so explicitly, Naftalis said.

“What could paraphernalia possibly refer to if it’s not personal property?” Souter said, referring to the agreement’s language.

“We would suggest paraphernalia was used for fixtures … not for theRimonim,” Naftalis said.

Judge McConnell in May declared Jeshuat Israel the rightful caretaker of Touro Synagogue and its religious artifacts. McConnell named Congregation Jeshuat trustee and removed Shearith Israel from that role, saying it strayed from its obligation to ensure public Jewish worship at Touro.

The dispute was sparked in 2012 when Congregation Jeshuat asked state court to declare it the owner of the decorative silver finial bells, crafted in the 1700s by renowned Colonial silversmith Myer Myers. The move would have cleared the way for the congregation to sell the bells to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston for $7.4 million.The museum later withdrew the offer.

Shearith Israel took the case to federal court, asking for it to be found as the rightful owner of the synagogue, its grounds and all its possessions. It sought to end Jeshuat Israels lease of the building.

Neither party would comment afterward about any impressions they drew from the judges’ questioning, other than to say it was clear that the panel was very well versed on the case and the issues in play. In closing, Judge Lynch thanked the lawyers for the high quality of their advocacy.

kmulvane@providencejournal.com

On Twitter: @kmulvane

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Fight over control of Newport’s historic Touro Synagogue goes to next level – The Providence Journal

Woodbridge synagogue hosts community for Shabbat across America – Inside NoVA

Congregation Ner Shalom in Woodbridge invited members of Dar al Noor and Grace United Methodist Church to join them for Shabbat across America on March 3 at the temple.

Other guests at the Jewish meal and experience were members of the Prince William County Police Department, VOICE, NAACP and Unity in the Community, along with guests from local houses of worship.

A Mediterranean community Shabbat dinner was served Friday evening and the Shabbat Across America service followed.

Ner Shalom is the countys only Jewish congregation since it formed after the merger of congregations Ner Tamid and Bayis Shalom in 1985.

For almost a decade Ner Shalom held weekly and holiday services in Community Baptist Church, until finally settling into its home at 14010 Spriggs Road in Woodbridge.

The congregation shared these photos from the evening on its Facebook page.

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Woodbridge synagogue hosts community for Shabbat across America – Inside NoVA

Appeals court hears arguments over Newport synagogue – WPRI 12 Eyewitness News


WPRI 12 Eyewitness News
Appeals court hears arguments over Newport synagogue
WPRI 12 Eyewitness News
In this Thursday, May 28, 2015 photo Touro Synagogue, the nation's oldest, is seen from the "ladies gallery" in Newport, R.I. Women attend synagogue seated on the second floor while men take their places on the ground floor. A federal judge has allowed
Fight over control of Newport's historic Touro Synagogue goes to next levelThe Providence Journal
Fight over control of oldest US synagogue at appeals court | The …Sacramento Bee
Fight over control of oldest US synagogue at appeals court …WWSB ABC 7

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Appeals court hears arguments over Newport synagogue – WPRI 12 Eyewitness News

Pensacola synagogue beefs up security following attacks – WEAR

Pensacola synagogue beefs up security following attacks

Attacks on Jewish landmarks and places of worship across the country have had an impact on a local level.

“With the recent threats going on we just want to kind of be sure that our congregation is safe,” Benjamin Nettles, president of the B’Nai Israel Synagogue said.

Nettles said they have not had any issues with threats or vandalism at their building on 9th Avenue, but feel it is necessary to beef up security. They have installed more lighting outside, as well as an alarm system and put extra locks on doors.

“When anyone is here like the sisterhood cooking Hamantaschen for Purim, we make sure they keep the doors locked,” Nettles said.

Jewish cemeteries have been desecrated in places like Philadelphia. On Tuesday, Jewish schools and community centers received dozens of bomb threats all over the country.

“I think it’s sad, it’s really sad that this is happening,” said Kate Lollar, a member of the B’Nai Israel Sisterhood. “It’s 2017, why is there anti-Semitism?”

She blames the president’s administration. She said they made it OK to hate and blame others. She said attacks on Jews is not a new issue, but feels it certainly has been revived.

“The one thing that I would love for everybody in the world to know is that Jewish people are not bad,” Lollar said. “We just want to get along with everybody else.”

She said Pensacola has been good to her. She said that when she celebrates Purim this weekend she expects nothing but a great time.

“I have no fear of being Jewish in Pensacola, Florida,” Lollar said.

Nettles agreed and adds that he had never experienced an attack on his faith in this community. He wants others around the country to be able to say the same.

“I feel like we should be able to come in and worship whichever way we want and we should feel safe in doing that, especially in this country,” Nettles said.

On Tuesday, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said that President Donald Trump condemns the attacks “in the strongest terms.”

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Pensacola synagogue beefs up security following attacks – WEAR

27 Years Ago, My Synagogue Was Vandalized By Skinheads Here’s What I’ve Learned Since Then. – Forward

The telephone woke me at 5:00 a.m. It was the police – never a good omen. But this wasnt about family or property, it was my synagogue.

Graffiti, the cop told me. In black spray paint. All along the outside wall. You better get down here, Rabbi.

I put on my glasses, sat up in bed, blinked away the fog. He called me rabbi, but that wasnt yet true. It was my senior year at JTS, twenty-seven years ago, and I was serving as student rabbi to a small congregation in northern New Jersey. Ill be right there, I said. But what kind of graffiti?

He cleared his throat, paused. Nazi stuff. Swastikas. A little more than that. Youll see when you get here.

It was more than that. The sentence Death to the Jews in three-foot letters had been scrawled twice along the white stucco wall facing the street. Smaller swastikas, maybe a dozen, floated among the letters, like ghastly decorations. And above the display: four pairs of twin lightning bolts a symbol that at the time I didnt recognize.

Shutzstaffel, the president of the congregation said, looking up. Dressed in jeans and a sweatshirt, he was waiting for me in front of the building. The police had woken him up also. The symbol of the SS. My father told me. I nodded. His father had served in World War II. A young policeman walked over. Probably adults, not kids, he told us. Most teenagers dont know about the twin lightning symbol. Handwriting looks adult, and you can see yourself the perpetrator had to be at least 6 feet tall. We stared, speechless. Adults? I was thinking demons. The cop shrugged. Probably skinheads. Weve got a few in the area. Well check it out. You might want to make some calls. He walked away, leaving his card.

Thats a good idea, the president told me. Lets make the calls.

I was still in shock, not fully awake. I felt hopelessly young, out of my depth. Call who? The ADL, I thought? JDL? FBI? My mom?

Congregants, he said. Right now, before minyan.

I nodded. Four of the ten early minyan regulars were Holocaust survivors. One had the famous tattoo on his arm; it was the first thing he showed when we met. I needed to call him first. The president had another idea. And call the local churches. Let them know what happened. In our town.

That turned out to be the most interesting, inspiring, disturbing and ultimately consequential experience of the whole ordeal. I took out the yellow pages (pre-Internet days), and called every local priest and minister. The responses ranged from outrage to tears to loving sympathy to indifference and irritation (Why would you call me? one guy asked. Did you think I did it?).

One minister took charge. Ill be over there in an hour, he said. Ill bring some kids, other volunteers. And white paint. Well take care of this. This is our town.

But I wasnt ready for them to paint over the wall so quickly. I tried to stop him, but hed hung up. So I grabbed my camera and ran back to the synagogue. I wanted to document the outrage. But the press beat me to it. Photographers from the New York and New Jersey newspapers crowded the lawn in front of the wall, along with two film crews. Wed be on the front pages the next day.

Within an hour church volunteers, mostly teenage boys, arrived with buckets, brushes, ladders, soap and white paint. By this time, word had spread and dozens of my congregants from the small community arrived. We watched as the non-Jews erased the nightmare. I felt a strange ambivalence seeing the ugly black letters fade to white. Theres something too easy, I thought, about painting it over, cleaning up the mess, starting again with a whiter wall. I should have made them wait a day, I thought. Let the town see it.

But there was a deeper misgiving, one I couldnt fully articulate back then. As I think about the incident now, I have an understanding of the reservations some Jews have expressed about Muslims raising money for desecrated Jewish cemeteries. Its not just the politics of Jew vs. Muslim. Its the feeling not helpful, but natural that when your community is under attack, you close ranks the sense that, given our history, our wounds, you cant trust outsiders, that, wrongly, unfairly, but inevitably, you see the vague outlines of perpetrator in every non-Jew.

The skinheads (it turned out to be skinheads) vandalized the synagogue on Thursday night. The next evening, erev Shabbat, the synagogue was full. After services, we sang Kol Haolam Kulo – the whole world is a narrow bridge, but the key is not to be afraid. I joked with the president that we should spray-paint the synagogue every Friday look what its done for our numbers! Indeed, the following week, we were back to our small group of regulars.

And the incident faded from my memory. Until very recently I never thought of it as a particularly important moment in my career. I was busy, ambitious, and on the move. Id just gotten married and was eager to build a life, a career beyond this small New Jersey synagogue. And I was convinced that the main challenge facing American Jews wasnt painting over swastikas, it was getting more Jews to care. That Friday night, Id chanted the main thing is not to be afraid, but the fact is I wasnt afraid. At least, I dont think I was.

Now Im not so sure. Im replaying the memory, and some of the old, spooky feelings are leaking through. Suspicion. Fear. And a sense that the world really is very narrow bridge.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are the authors own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Forward.

The Forward’s independent journalism depends on donations from readers like you.

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27 Years Ago, My Synagogue Was Vandalized By Skinheads Here’s What I’ve Learned Since Then. – Forward

Two arrested in car burglaries outside Dania beach synagogue – Sun Sentinel

Like any other Friday, Moshe Elbilia attended synagogue with his wife and kids, leaving his car parked there overnight, intending to pick it up once the Sabbath ended on Saturday evening.

But last month, Elbilia and at least seven other people returned to find each of their cars with the drivers side window smashed.

Its not something you expect to see, Elbilia said. Its not something pleasant.

The Broward Sheriffs Office on Tuesday announced two arrests in connection with the Feb. 3 car burglaries at 2615 Stirling Road, near Eliyahu Hanavi Beit Midrash synagogue in Dania Beach.

Jamal Meyers, 29, of Davie and Deneisha Bruce, 23, of Dania Beach, are facing charges related to the car burglaries and credit card fraud.

Investigators say someone, later identified as Meyers, broke into the cars that had been left parked overnight by members of the synagogue.

Elbilia said that during the Sabbath, he and other members walk home from the synagogue and pick up their cars the next day.

As a religious person, you dont drive on the Sabbath, Elbilia said. We [also] dont use cellphones [during the Sabbath], so we had to wait until Saturday night to call police.

Each car had been rummaged through, but only three had items missing, according to an incident report. Some of the items stolen were driver licenses, credit cards and GPS systems.

During the investigation, detectives discovered that Meyers used one of the victims credit cards at the Chevron gas station about an hour after the car burglaries.

On that same night, Bruce gave her name and address when she ordered $100 worth of food from a Pizza Hut using one of the stolen credit cards and had it delivered to her house, according to her arrest report.

The next morning, Bruce also tried to buy more than $500 worth of items from a Walmart with another one of the stolen cards. She was caught on surveillance video inside the Walmart, her arrest report said.

During the investigation, someone related to Meyers identified him to authorities, according to his arrest report.

After the two arrests, Investigators were able to return the stolen items back to their rightful owners, the sheriffs office said.

Bruce was released Saturday on a $3,100 bond, the sheriffs office said. Meyers is being held on a $7,400 bond at the Broward Main Jail.

rpiccardo@sun-sentinel.com, 954-356-4544 or Twitter @rebecapiccardo

Original post:
Two arrested in car burglaries outside Dania beach synagogue – Sun Sentinel

Man steals money from Queens synagogue charity box – New York Daily News

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‘We want action’: call to return former Toledo synagogue to Jewish community – The Guardian

Among the fans, parasols and knick-knacks in the gift shop of the Santa Mara la Blanca museum are bottles of kosher wine and tiles painted with menorahs and magens David.

They are testament to the fact that, despite its name not to mention its incarnations as a church, a barracks and a warehouse the museum began its life in the 12th century as Toledos main synagogue.

Today, the mudjar masterpiece is one of citys most popular tourist attractions, a building whose walls and pillars reflect the interplay of three different cultures: Christian, Jewish and Islamic.

Visitors armed with selfie sticks and headsets mill between its white horseshoe arches, peering down at the tiled floor or up at the cherubs and christograms that sit alongside the geometric patterns.

Although Santa Mara la Blanca has not been a synagogue since it was seized and turned into a church at the beginning of the 15th century, some feel the time has come for it to be returned to the Jewish community.

Isaac Querub, the president of Spains Federation of Jewish Communities, is calling on the archbishop of Toledo to demonstrate the churchs commitment to interfaith relations through the symbolic gesture of handing back the building.

More than five centuries after Ferdinand and Isabella ordered Spains Jews to convert or leave the country and 42 years after Pope Paul VI repudiated antisemitism and called for mutual understanding and respect between Roman Catholics and Jews Querub claims the Spanish church is lagging behind society when it comes to atoning for the mistakes of the past.

The winds of Rome have blown very weakly in Spain, he said. The gestures of John XXIII, Paul VI, John Paul II, Benedict XVI and Pope Francis seem to be reaching Spain very late or not at all.

He pointed to the Spanish governments recent decision to introduce a law offering citizenship to the descendants of Sephardic Jews expelled in 1492, arguing that Spain had taken giant steps towards dealing with the sins of its past.

But he said: Why wont the Catholic church in Spain do the same? When someone sincerely recognises that theyve made an error and tries to fix an injustice, they become a better person. Its the same thing: Spain is a better place and its society has made progress. No political party opposed the law. Frankly, it was just extremely positive. The same thing needs to happen with the church: there needs to be Judeo-Christian dialogue.

Its not about starting a war we want to deepen the Judeo-Christian dialogue

Querub says he wrote to the archbishop of Toledo, Braulio Rodrguez Plaza, last year to request a meeting on the issue but is still awaiting an answer.

And the archdiocese of Toledo shows few signs of contemplating any return of the building. In a three-page statement, it said the churchs ownership of the now-deconsecrated building was perfectly clear and that the government had restored Santa Mara la Blanca to the care of the archdiocese through a local parish in 1929.

It said that the archbishop had met Querub twice most recently in November last year adding: They agreed to meet again after Christmas, but neither Mr Querub nor anyone acting on his behalf has asked in writing for an official meeting, which is why the archbishop has been unable to respond to his request.

The statement also pointed out that the proceeds from the museum went on the upkeep of other buildings in the archdiocese and that the archbishop had spent almost 800,000 (685,000) on conserving the building since 2013.

It concluded with a reminder that the nearby Sinagoga del Trnsito belonged to the government, rather then the church.

The archbishop of Madrid, Cardinal Carlos Osoro Sierra, recently struck a more conciliatory note and emphasised the need for dialogue. Gestures that bring us together and help us all are good, he told El Pas. Of course I think theyre good. Santa Mara la Blanca needs to be a meeting place.

However, a spokesman for the archdiocese of Madrid told the Guardian that the cardinal had been talking in general terms and had not offered an opinion on whether the building ought to be handed back.

Spains Jewish population numbers fewer than 100,000, most of whom live in Madrid, Barcelona and Mlaga. There was, Querub said, no Jewish community in Toledo today but that was not the point; the federation was not looking to reclaim Santa Mara la Blanca as a place of worship but to use it as museum that finally acknowledges its roots and uses its original name.

Its not about starting a war we want to deepen the Judeo-Christian dialogue, he said. We want to see action and better education: we want to see the Catholic churchs teaching centres doing more to explain what happened 2,000 years ago and teaching people about the Jewish people and the link between them and the land of Israel.

Querub pointed to the centuries of blood libel, propaganda and the antisemitic slurs that continue to exist in the Spanish language.

People still use the word judiada [to describe acts of cruelty or extortion] and in Len [during Holy Week] they talk about killing some Jews when they mean having a few drinks.

He believes the return of Santa Mara la Blanca would be a landmark event that would demonstrate the churchs commitment to drawing a line under the past.

But were not the ones who should be telling the Catholic church what it needs to do, how it needs to do it or when it needs to do it. Wed just like this symbolic gesture.

Original post:
‘We want action’: call to return former Toledo synagogue to Jewish community – The Guardian

New Kensington Synagogue Music Series Debuts Thursday – BKLYNER

Flatbush Jewish Center. (Photo by Carly Miller)

Inspired by a growing number of New York synagogues showcasing musical performances, guitarist and composer Yoshie Fruchterlaunched Church Avenue Sessions, a monthly series of concerts at Kensingtons Flatbush Jewish Center.

The debut performance on Thursday features two fun and magnetic bands from the neighborhood: Jazzy Klezmer bandWho Is Manny Blanc and the costumed ragtime quartet Xylopholks.

Many sanctuaries were also designed with acoustics in mind, to optimize the quality of sound of the prayer leaders voice, Fruchter said. I truly believe that there is a spiritual depth to places of worship a serenity that provides a performer with an ideal space for creation.

Fruchters been an eclectic musician since he released his first solo album in 2008. His latest project, Cantorial Recordings Reimagined, features his arrangements of Jewish worship music performed by Schizophonia, a progressive rock quintet. Although hes best known in the jazz world, Fruchters records freely quote elements of punk, surf rock, klezmer music, and heavy metal.

That wide-open approach to music is shared by one of the bands Fruchter tapped for the initial performance of the Church Avenue Sessions. Matt Darriau, clarinetist for the Grammy-winning Klezmatics, created the group, which is named for the musical question in seeks to answer: Who Is Manny Blanc?

Manny Blanc was a Brooklyn musician just barely remembered for the 1961 album Jewish Jazz. One of the earliest attempts to play klezmer music in a jazz and rock context, the record has been all but forgotten good luck finding it on Spotify. On a mission to bring the music to a wider audience, Darriau recruited Fruchter and other musicians to play Blancs idiosyncratic compositions for a contemporary audience.

The Xylopholks, who fill out the bill at Thursdays show, reach even further back for musical inspiration. Performing ragtime music with dynamic ensembles built around xylophones, the group dons furry animal costumes in case the novelty factor of their shows werent already off the charts.

Jon Singer, who leads the Xylopholks, is a true virtuoso in every sense of the word, and also one of the funniest and most engaging performers that I know, said Fruchter.

Though the bands selected for the opening concert are diverse musically, Fruchter noted they have a couple of important things in common. I wanted to have music that I thought would be fun for your 10-year-old, your hipster cousin, and your grandpa, he said.

Between Who is Manny Blanc and the Xylopholks, we have a pretty eclectic palette of sounds and magnetic energy that I think will appeal to a large range of audience types.

The Kensington connection was another factor in Fruchters choice. With this series, I also really want to focus on musicians in the neighborhood, the guitarist said. One of the reasons we moved to Kensington from Prospect Heights a couple of years ago is because of the great and diverse musical community here.

Fruchter plans to showcase local performers as he curates the monthly shows in the series. Every month will be something completely different and amazing, he promised.

The debut concert in the Church Avenue Sessions is scheduled for Thursday, March 9 at 7:30pm at the Flatbush Jewish Center, located at 327 East 5th Street at Church Avenue. Tickets are $15 and are available at the door.

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New Kensington Synagogue Music Series Debuts Thursday – BKLYNER

Synagogue vandalism suspect is accountant with a master’s degree … – Boing Boing

Stuart Wright has two tattoos, writes Sam Charles of The Chicago News: one says “Jesus is love” and the other is a swastika. This educated accountant from the suburbs was arrested late February and charged with a hate crime after someone smashed the window of a downtown synagogue and stuck swastikas on the doors.

Wright graduated from Hinsdale Central High School in 2003 and went on to the University of Iowa. He later received a masters degree in accounting from DePaul University.

According to Wrights LinkedIn profile, he worked as an accountant for four companies between June 2012 and September 2015. He became a certified public accountant in 2013 and his license is valid until September 2018, according to state records.

Property records show Wrights father a retired investment banker owns a five-bedroom, six-bathroom house with a three-car garage in west suburban Oak Brook. It has been for sale since February 2016 with a price tag of nearly $1.5 million.

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Synagogue vandalism suspect is accountant with a master’s degree … – Boing Boing

Cheshire synagogue prepared as threats against Jewish community continue – Meriden Record-Journal

CHESHIRE Temple Beth David officials say they are prepared in the event a threat is made toward the synagogue.

Kim Math, the synagogues president, said threats and vandalism of Jewish cemeteries across the country have been frightening.

I dont remember ever in my lifetime seeing such a rash of antisemitic behavior, she said. When you grow up in religious school, youre taught about it, you learn about the Holocaust, different types of behaviors, different types of discrimination.

From this section: Annual Cheshire show draws train enthusiasts from around northeast

To actually see it first hand so intensely, its a little scary, she added.

Since early January, Jewish Community Centers and institutions around the country, including area centers in West Hartford and Woodbridge, have received more than 100 bomb threats in multiple waves. As recently as Tuesday, four centers and a day school in New York, Maryland, Florida, Wisconsin and Oregon received threats.

The Anti-Defamation League said it also received bomb threats at its offices in Boston, New York, Atlanta and Washington D.C. Tuesday. The organization has called on President Donald Trump and lawmakers to take action.

This is not normal. We will not be deterred or intimated, Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, said in a statement.

Jewish cemeteries have also been vandalized. In February, about 150 headstones were damaged or tipped at a cemetery outside St. Louis. A similar incident also occurred at a cemetery in Philadelphia.

Math said the synagogue is prepared if a threat were to be called in. She declined to disclose specific steps the synagogue has taken.

We have resources were pulling from to ensure that we have adequate plans in case there is a credible threat made, she said.

Temple Beth David was established in 1968 and moved into its current building, 3 Main St., a short time later. The synagogue serves about 200 families.

Rabbi Ilene Bogosian said police notified the synagogue and increased patrols around the building after a threat was made in January against the Jewish Community Center of New Haven in Woodbridge. The community center also alerted other area synagogues as a precaution.

That was a very reassuring thing, Bogosian said.

Bogosian said the best way to combat threats and vandalism is to contact authorities.

The constant threat, its so disruptive of communities, she said. This is something of another dimension. Sometimes theres nothing much you can say, except call your local law enforcement and have them attend to the mater. I dont think these are people you can talk to.

Math said members of the synagogue feel safe despite the ongoing threats.

We feel fairly safe here, Math said.

blipiner@record-journal.com 203-317-2444 Twitter: @BryanLipiner

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Cheshire synagogue prepared as threats against Jewish community continue – Meriden Record-Journal

Northtown Auto’s purchase of Amherst synagogue to ease Dent’s … – Buffalo News

Northtown Automotive Cos. plans to convert a synagogue on Getzville Road in Amherst into administrative offices and an employee training center and to lease 300 parking spaces at the site to the nearby Dent Neurologic Institute.

The auto dealership revealed new details about its initial redevelopment plans for the property as the Amherst Town Board on Monday voted 4-1 to approve the rezoning that’s required before the congregation at Temple Beth Tzedek can sell its longtime home.

The temple and the dealership have been in talks for months over a sale of the 9-acre property at 621 Getzville Road,off Sheridan Drive, next to the Youngmann Expressway. Temple Beth Tzedek is seeking to sell the property because it has merged withanother congregation, B’nai Shalom, which has a synagogue on North Forest Road, south of West Klein Road.

The merged congregation is holding services at both locations, on Getzville Road and on North Forest Road, until the sale of the Getzville Road property goes through, a synagogue representative previously said.

Eventually, the Temple Beth Tzedek congregation will move to North Forest Road and use the proceeds from the sale of the Getzville Road site to pay for an expansion of the existing synagogue there. The parties have not revealed the sale price.

Northtown had not said much about its plans for the property.

That’s because the dealership had not yet put together a long-term plan for the site, according to Sean W. Hopkins, Northtown’s attorney.

The Town Board had voted at its Feb. 6 meeting to adjourn the rezoning request until it received more information from Northtown about its plans for the site. Hopkins sought to address that concern in his letter.

An attorney for the synagogue, Steven B. Bengart, also wrote to the town to seek its support for the rezoning.In his letter, Bengart said the sale would place the property back onto the tax rolls, since it previously was exempt from property taxes because it was owned by a religious organization.

Hopkins said the dealership would take over and renovate the temple building on the property for administrative and training offices.Northtown also would create and lease a parking lot with 300 spaces for Dent Neurologic Group, although some of the spaces would be located in a strip in the back of the dealership’s existing property at 3890 Sheridan Drive. The medical practice would have a 10-year lease.

The parking would sit between the former temple, to the west, and Northtown Kia, Mazda and Subaru, to the east, at 3890 Sheridan. Dent Neurologic Institute sits just to the east at 3980 Sheridan, where parking spaces are at a premium.

“The 300 spots are going to do wonders to the parking problem we’ve been experiencing at Dent Tower,” said Deputy Supervisor Steven D. Sanders. “How they were able to build what they built back there without enough parking, I don’t know.”

Currently, many Dent employees park across Sheridan Drive at Excelsior Orthopaedics or on town roads, which Sanders said was “detrimental” to the neighborhood.

“I think this is going to be a vast improvement by cutting down on people crossing Sheridan Drive,” he said.

Council Member Deborah Bruch Bucki cast the sole vote against the rezoning, saying she preferred to wait two weeks until the board’s next meeting to have time to review additional correspondence received Monday about the project.

News Staff Reporter Joseph Popiolkowski contributed to this report.

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Northtown Auto’s purchase of Amherst synagogue to ease Dent’s … – Buffalo News